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billdozer
01-08-2011, 11:23 PM
71 T100C with points, Sparks regulator/capacitor, no battery,

When I got it there was no kill switch, I would just stall it to shut it off.

I'm in the process of wiring up some lights on it and want to add a kill switch.

I have a really nice "Momentary On" switch, basically a sealed starter switch for a race car/universal fit.

I was thinking I could run this between ground and the positive side of the coils and when depressed it would ground out the coils and shut down the bike.

Now that I think about it, it seems there is a very good chance that it would just melt shit by grounding out the positive side of the coils.

Will it work, or do I need to get a "Momentary Off" switch and run it inline on the positive lead to the coils.

Thanks in advance.

Torch
01-09-2011, 9:33 PM
OK, Bill, here is the thing, you have switch you want, but is called a "normally open, momentary closed" switch.
When you push the button it should contact the two wires together, when you let go of the switch it "opens", thus the name "normally open". Now here is how you should wire it up. on that switch you should have 2 wires, run one wire to the same terminal as the points is connected to on each coil, so when you push the button it will connect one coil to the other coil. (this is how Triumph wires all the type C bikes.) The system works because at any given time one set of points is grounded, connecting the two confuses the coils and neither one fires the plugs and the engine stops.

billdozer
01-09-2011, 11:36 PM
Thanks Tony. I ended up just putting an inline toggle between the coils and power and it's working. I'll save that other switch for something down the road.

KT
01-10-2011, 9:16 AM
Thanks Tony. I ended up just putting an inline toggle between the coils and power and it's working. I'll save that other switch for something down the road.

Thats what i did for a kill switch with the mag on mine justa regular toggle switch

Torch
01-18-2011, 10:34 AM
Thanks Tony. I ended up just putting an inline toggle between the coils and power and it's working. I'll save that other switch for something down the road.

the only thing about doing it that way is you have a hot wire running in the open along your handle bars. if you fall and rip it off you push the bike back home, the other way both wires are just grounds and if they get ripped off the bike will run you just don't have a kill button.

billdozer
01-19-2011, 12:57 AM
the only thing about doing it that way is you have a hot wire running in the open along your handle bars. if you fall and rip it off you push the bike back home, the other way both wires are just grounds and if they get ripped off the bike will run you just don't have a kill button.

It's actually under the seat, but easily reachable. I get it and will probably change it because that makes sense. Thanks again for the wisdom Tony.

Torch
01-19-2011, 9:37 AM
Five good reasons kill buttons should be on the bars...
1. Have you ever had the throttle on a Amal carb stick wide open ? you will.
2. When you do those 10 pm test rides through the neighborhood you can kill it at 50 mph and stealth glide back into the garage.
3. You just pulled a 3 gear blast and you see a cop looking around for the source of all that noise.
4. Your drunk buddy tries to test ride your bike, you can hit the kill button with one hand and bitch slap him with the other.
5.. Those "Dead stick landings" really make you look like a professional rider.

Hepcat13
01-19-2011, 9:49 AM
What if you running a harley coil instead of 2?

Torch
01-19-2011, 10:38 AM
if you have a single, dual lead coil (Harley type) with Points then all you do is use a single wire kill button that grounds the coil on the same terminal that the points are connected to.
If you have an electroinic ignition it gets a little more involved. If its wired as a positive ground bike you will need a 2 wire normally closed switch that opens the white wire to the brain box and kills the bike.
If it's wired as a negative ground bike you can use a single wire (grounding) type switch that grounds the terminal the black wire is connected to.
with all Electronic ignitions you have to be care full how you hook up a kill button there are instructions on how to do it in the box, you can destroy the brain box if you do it wrong,
when you have a single coil and points it's easy. with dual coils and points you need the correct "Type C" 2 wire kill button.
One of these days I'll draw up a diagram for all the kill switch wiring's and post it, I'm a big believer in kill buttons.

ridemore16
01-19-2011, 10:44 AM
Five good reasons kill buttons should be on the bars...
1. Have you ever had the throttle on a Amal carb stick wide open ? you will.


When that first happened to me I freaked out...thought the motor was going to blow

3trumpets
01-27-2011, 10:01 PM
you've got it right. I had same problem with a bobber I picked up a couple of years back. no kill switch is a great way to fuck up your clutch discs. I mounted my switch on top of the headlight for a clean set up. good luck, man

BrokenLightCustoms
02-18-2013, 9:18 PM
Ok guys, I wire all my customers cars and bikes from scratch and rarely run into any issue that I just cant get my head around...but this ones got me stumped...

Ive got a 70 bonneville. Rewired the whole thing, with Sparx unit, neg ground, small 5 amp battery, dual 6v coils and new points. Ive got the Ign switch wired to turn on the power from the battery to everything but the lights, which is a seperate switch. Obviously since its a Sparx unit, it will run with the key off still. But, I have a toggle kill switch that connects the 2 neg sides of the coils for a kill switch, which in theory, grounds the coils and kills the engine....except it doesnt. It just keeps running. WTF? I changed the points out and gapped them correctly incase they werent getting enough contact... but nothing. This style kill switch is what they did from the factory, but why doent this work the way it should? I cant imagine it has anything to do with POS/NEG ground, it shouldnt matter...
Any ideas, besides saying to get a Boyer elec ign kit! (Or a Pazon smartass)
James

TheLakewoodKid2
02-18-2013, 9:39 PM
something is feeding back to the coils

Torch
02-18-2013, 11:45 PM
Ok guys, I wire all my customers cars and bikes from scratch and rarely run into any issue that I just cant get my head around...but this ones got me stumped...

Ive got a 70 bonneville. Rewired the whole thing, with Sparx unit, neg ground, small 5 amp battery, dual 6v coils and new points. Ive got the Ign switch wired to turn on the power from the battery to everything but the lights, which is a seperate switch. Obviously since its a Sparx unit, it will run with the key off still. But, I have a toggle kill switch that connects the 2 neg sides of the coils for a kill switch, which in theory, grounds the coils and kills the engine....except it doesnt. It just keeps running. WTF? I changed the points out and gapped them correctly incase they werent getting enough contact... but nothing. This style kill switch is what they did from the factory, but why doent this work the way it should? I cant imagine it has anything to do with POS/NEG ground, it shouldnt matter...
Any ideas, besides saying to get a Boyer elec ign kit! (Or a Pazon smartass)
James
it has nothing to do with positive or negative ground.

and.. I have several questions for you...

1. Why are you trying to ground out the coils with a toggle instead of using that toggle to turn the power to the coils on and off?

2. why do you say "it's a Sparx so it will run with the key off?... the Sparx unit should be sending it's power to the battery and the battery power should be going through the switches. it sounds like you have it wired so the running power from the Sparx unit goes around the power switches.

3. those 6 volt coils are gonna get real hot and burn out rather quickly after running for a while on the 12 volt points ignition. The 6 volt coils are meant used on 6 volt bikes or to be wired in series (making it one dual lead 12 volt coil) and used on an electronic ignition or with a ballast resister by-pass system on the electric start Triumphs and Nortons.

4. the 2 wire type C handle bar mounted kill switchs on unit Triumphs connected one coil to the other coil thus canceling the firing signal from the points, it didn't ground them.

5. and loose those points, just put a Pazon it there,... points have gone the way of the dial phones :)

Seriously- a lot of melted pistons are caused by badly timed points and or worn out advance units, burned condensers and bouncing points.

It's time for you to step into the 21st century...

BrokenLightCustoms
02-19-2013, 12:16 AM
Torch, thanks for the reply..I have only one good answer, the rest would be duh moments...
Well, connecting the 2 coils technically "grounds" the points, isnt that why it works in the first place? So Im not grounding the coils, I'm connecting them with the kill.
I guess from looking through many diagrams, I assumed (which was my mistake) that 2 6 volt coils with points were ok, but the whole time I was thinking...hmmm, sure doesnt seem right sending 12v to 6v coils.
And I was thinking since wiring the battery to the Sparx and then that to the key really made the battery go to the key so why not make the Sparx on the keyed hot side so its not constant hot, but I realize now thats not how they work.
Thanks for bitch slapping the over-thought out of me there. Its always good to be humbled. Working in the shop alone all day never lets you have fresh eyes on anything!
As far as points vs electronic, I have no good excuse except that I was trying to be sure the bike ran and wasnt a dud before I pissed away $145 on an ignition for a junk engine :) So now that it runs (and wont shut off) I'll blow off the spider webs from my wallet. My other bikes have them, but being cheap always gets you in the same place... pissed that stuff doesnt work right.
Thanks again

Torch
02-19-2013, 12:27 AM
Torch, thanks for the reply..I have only one good answer, the rest would be duh moments...
Well, connecting the 2 coils technically "grounds" the points, isnt that why it works in the first place? So Im not grounding the coils, I'm connecting them with the kill.
I guess from looking through many diagrams, I assumed (which was my mistake) that 2 6 volt coils with points were ok, but the whole time I was thinking...hmmm, sure doesnt seem right sending 12v to 6v coils.
And I was thinking since wiring the battery to the Sparx and then that to the key really made the battery go to the key so why not make the Sparx on the keyed hot side so its not constant hot, but I realize now thats not how they work.
Thanks for bitch slapping the over-thought out of me there. Its always good to be humbled. Working in the shop alone all day never lets you have fresh eyes on anything!
As far as points vs electronic, I have no good excuse except that I was trying to be sure the bike ran and wasnt a dud before I pissed away $145 on an ignition for a junk engine :) So now that it runs (and wont shut off) I'll blow off the spider webs from my wallet. My other bikes have them, but being cheap always gets you in the same place... pissed that stuff doesnt work right.
Thanks again
no connecting the two coils with the kill switch does not technically ground them, it Confuses them by giving them both incorrectly timed signals to fire from the other set of points and killing the engine with the wrong firing order.

heretic530
02-19-2013, 1:24 AM
quick question Torch..

purely hypothetical, because my own bike is wired so kill switch interrupts power to the coils..
if you were to use a momentary kill switch to confuse the coils, with electronic ignition, wouldn't you have have the potential for problems with heating up the unit? I realize that a kill button is not supposed to be held for long periods of time, but the idea still make me nervous...

BrokenLightCustoms
02-19-2013, 8:33 AM
Torch, I'm new to the site, not electrical systems. A points system is based on an open ground....see diagram. So "confusing" them is not possible since they do what theyre told, they dont think. Confusing them means connecting them via a switch, which in turn tells the open ground that its closed..."confusing" it to "think" to do something at the wrong time. The reason the switch works is because while one point is not grounded, the other is, and if you connect them while one is grounded, they both become grounded...or open simultaneously.

An electronic system is no different. It reads a pickup that tells it to ground and/or fire, just like points, but its using a much more accurate system to tell the plug to fire. Theyre better because theyre more accurate, not because they do anything different.
:)

heretic530
02-19-2013, 8:44 AM
Broken light...do you realize what you are doing in this thread?

You are telling us how you wire "customer" bikes, but what you have told us about one you are wiring is a guaranteed failure . Then you try to dispute information given to you when someone tells you how to fix the mess you have.

stop and think this through for a minute. You admit that your way is not working. Good advise is being offered. You have NOTHING to gain by trying to argue semantics.

Torch
02-19-2013, 8:51 AM
Torch, I'm new to the site, not electrical systems. A points system is based on an open ground....see diagram. So "confusing" them is not possible since they do what theyre told, they dont think. Confusing them means connecting them via a switch, which in turn tells the open ground that its closed..."confusing" it to "think" to do something at the wrong time. The reason the switch works is because while one point is not grounded, the other is, and if you connect them while one is grounded, they both become grounded...or open simultaneously.

An electronic system is no different. It reads a pickup that tells it to ground and/or fire, just like points, but its using a much more accurate system to tell the plug to fire. Theyre better because theyre more accurate, not because they do anything different.
:)


the thing you are forgetting about the the capacitance of the wires, the coil windings and the condensers, and even the points dwell comes into play,

Many people run two set of points with one dual plug wire coil on a Triumph, It doesn't make sense since one set of points is always closed, but it works fine and many people wire their bikes this way. Capacitance is the reason .

when I refered to the term "confusing" it means the firing order is confused by connecting the right side fire signal to the left side cylinder and vice versa and it only works at a low idle.

I don't know how you have it wired now, but, to try and ground both coils at the same time you will technically need a 'double poll' kill button or you have both coils joined together at that 'single poll' kill button and you are double firing the coils the whole time it's running.
You would be better off with a normally closed kill switch opening the hot wire going to both coils, but with this type of switch many people forget to turn the key off and burn everything up

.the confusion kill method worked because of the timed power of the Energy Transfer ignition system on all the type C Triumphs built before 1968, after that all bikes were required to have a battery after that the bike often kept on running when the rpms were up a bit.
from 1969 through 1970 they had no kill buttons, and then in 1971 Triumph used a normally closed kill switch to open the hot wire going to both coils. (which also had problems..with handlebar vibrations and forgetting to turn the key off)


As for the old points E/I argument...

E/I's have many other reasons they are better that points.. from the worn out auto advance unit with variable point gap and weak springs, many AAU units over retard the ignition at idle and over advance it because the little slots that control the advance amount wear out further open , then there is points bounce, burned and corroded points contacts, intermittent condenser break down. and then go ahead and leave the keys on a bit too long and see what it does to the coils battery and points.

IMO what it comes down to is ...

If you want a bike to run problem free for an extended period ..loose the points and put an E/I in there
.
If you enjoy hours of tinkering in the garage trying to solve poor running issues.. stay with points.

Hope this helps.. Tony

BrokenLightCustoms
02-19-2013, 9:16 AM
Whoa... forgive me if I seemed ungrateful or argumentative...NOT my intention at all! I'm not here for the ego or to argue by any means. I already said I missed the boat on connecting to the wrong side of the key. I understand why things work, but have not used every component on "customer" stuff.
Thanks Torch for the input and knowledge.... I've been reading posts by you for a while as a non-member and I always get plenty of knowledge out of it.
Please dont think I'm trying to be a know it all by any means though...my statements are always more of questions. I'm always open to be educated!!!
Thanks again

Torch
02-19-2013, 10:34 AM
quick question Torch..

purely hypothetical, because my own bike is wired so kill switch interrupts power to the coils..
if you were to use a momentary kill switch to confuse the coils, with electronic ignition, wouldn't you have have the potential for problems with heating up the unit? I realize that a kill button is not supposed to be held for long periods of time, but the idea still make me nervous...
there is no confusing an E/I ignition, the E/I's switch the negative signal to fire both cylinders at the same time by using a single dual plug wire coil (or two coils wired in series) to do this, so E/I's have a dead fire on the exhaust stroke.

So by grounding (on a negative ground bike) this wire yes you are giving the coils one big long "fire signal" and yes you are only supposed to hold it down long enough to kill the engine at which point the coils no longer get any more fire signals for the E/I box. and the E/I goes to sleep after a couple of seconds of no activity.

yes it technically heats the coils for a second or two but it's less harmful than turning the key on and kick starting the bike with a points ignition.

yes, it would be better for the system to use a normally closed switch to open the hot wire to the coils

Torch
02-19-2013, 10:37 AM
Whoa... forgive me if I seemed ungrateful or argumentative...NOT my intention at all! I'm not here for the ego or to argue by any means. I already said I missed the boat on connecting to the wrong side of the key. I understand why things work, but have not used every component on "customer" stuff.
Thanks Torch for the input and knowledge.... I've been reading posts by you for a while as a non-member and I always get plenty of knowledge out of it.
Please dont think I'm trying to be a know it all by any means though...my statements are always more of questions. I'm always open to be educated!!!
Thanks again

Don't worry, I didn't take anything that way .

We (myself included) are all getting a "shared experience" education on these forums.

It's all good.

heretic530
02-19-2013, 4:03 PM
there is no confusing an E/I ignition, the E/I's switch the negative signal to fire both cylinders at the same time by using a single dual plug wire coil (or two coils wired in series) to do this, so E/I's have a dead fire on the exhaust stroke.

So by grounding (on a negative ground bike) this wire yes you are giving the coils one big long "fire signal" and yes you are only supposed to hold it down long enough to kill the engine at which point the coils no longer get any more fire signals for the E/I box. and the E/I goes to sleep after a couple of seconds of no activity.

yes it technically heats the coils for a second or two but it's less harmful than turning the key on and kick starting the bike with a points ignition.

yes, it would be better for the system to use a normally closed switch to open the hot wire to the coils
I understand the difference between single and dual fire.. but I was speaking only hypothetically. It was one of those things that popped into my head.
I do not like dual fire systems, and I wish someone would make a single fire for a triumph. I thought about revisiting the capacitive discharge ideas of the 80s, where the points were left in the bike as switches and still used the mechanical advance unit...

Torch
02-19-2013, 6:43 PM
I understand the difference between single and dual fire.. but I was speaking only hypothetically. It was one of those things that popped into my head.
I do not like dual fire systems, and I wish someone would make a single fire for a triumph. I thought about revisiting the capacitive discharge ideas of the 80s, where the points were left in the bike as switches and still used the mechanical advance unit...
it's high RPM points bounce and a spring loaded mechanical movement advance that makes a Hall effect firing and RPM programmed chip controlled advance E/I ignitions so much accurate and problem free.

and as for the single and dual fire ignition thing its not as big of a deal on a true 360 degree fired twin cylinder like a Triumph as it is on a Harley twin. most all high performance Jap 4 cylinders bikes use 2 dual fire ignitions because they are also just 2 full 360 rotation twins mated together.

Harleys do run smother on single fire ignitions because of the offset firing order, it doesn't effect Triumphs, and the coil saturation time is fine on a dual fire Triumph twin

Pete60
02-20-2013, 5:13 AM
Many people run two set of points with one dual plug wire coil on a Triumph, It doesn't make sense since one set of points is always closed, but it works fine and many people wire their bikes this way.
It does make sense that the bike will run when it's wired like this.
One set of points is not always closed.Nothing to do with capacitance.
Dwell angle is 160 degrees (less than 180).

One set of points opens and you get spark.20 camshaft degrees (40 crankshaft degrees) later the other set of points closes.They open 160 camshaft degrees later (while the other points are still open),and you get another spark.
20 camshaft degrees later the first set of points close again,and so on.

It's not smart to run a dual lead coil,but it works.The coil gets very hot,and doesn't have 200 camshaft degrees to cool down,like the normal 2 coil arrangement.

Joining the points wires worked as a kill switch on E.T. bikes,because the AAU in the E.T. system had a much longer dwell (more than 180 degrees).There was no time where both points were open.

There's no difference in power between a properly set up points ignition and E.I.
The points system is over-designed by about 100%.You could use 1/2 as much dwell angle and still run strong to 8000 rpm;I've tried it.
The pre-67 AAU was the one that had trouble with points bounce and stray sparks..

There are some other reasons for using E.I.,and it works O.K.The biggest argument for using E.I. seems to be advance curve,and less maintenance.You can change the springs on a good AAU,and get any advance curve you like.

racer32
05-14-2014, 5:38 PM
when you have a single coil and points it's easy. with dual coils and points you need the correct "Type C" 2 wire kill button.
One of these days I'll draw up a diagram for all the kill switch wiring's and post it, I'm a big believer in kill buttons.

Hey Torch, digging up an old thread...hopefully you'll see this. I've got a 71 Bonneville with points & dual coils. I'm wiring up the ignition, and don't plan on using a switch in the ignition primary (it's a dirt bike). The kill button I have is a 2-wire unit for Suzuki RM-pushing button closes the circuit. From what I'm reading, it seems that all I need to do is connect one wire to each coil, correct?

Torch
05-14-2014, 9:05 PM
yes, but only on a no battery bike.

racer32
05-14-2014, 11:30 PM
yes, but only on a no battery bike.

Thanks, Torch. You made my night. Gonna have that bitch running in the morning!

SNOT275
05-21-2014, 1:57 AM
Hey Torch, digging up an old thread...hopefully you'll see this. I've got a 71 Bonneville with points & dual coils. I'm wiring up the ignition, and don't plan on using a switch in the ignition primary (it's a dirt bike). The kill button I have is a 2-wire unit for Suzuki RM-pushing button closes the circuit. From what I'm reading, it seems that all I need to do is connect one wire to each coil, correct?

Torch, on your wiring diagram for a no battery bike, you have one wire of the kill switch going to the neg side of the coil and the other kill switch wire going to ground... Is that wrong? I'm just about to wire up my bike in a few days and the way I ran my kill on my last no batt bike was from your diagram and it worked fine. Should I switch it up? (Switch it up... See what I did there?!)

Torch
05-21-2014, 8:12 AM
the correct kill switch wiring depends on if your bike is a negative or positive ground bike.

On a negative ground bike with an electronic ignition, the ground kill button just sends a continuous negative signal to the coil (same as the signal from the black wire on the brain box ) and kills the engine.

SNOT275
05-21-2014, 1:12 PM
the correct kill switch wiring depends on if your bike is a negative or positive ground bike.

On a negative ground bike with an electronic ignition, the ground kill button just sends a continuous negative signal to the coil (same as the signal from the black wire on the brain box ) and kills the engine.

Ok, my wiring ignorance is popping up... again.... My bike is wired for neg ground. You're basically saying that I can go either way? I'll be using that micro push button kill that lowbrow sells, by the way, if that makes a difference at all.

here's a link to it: http://www.lowbrowcustoms.com/p2567/buy/m-c-parts/electrical-amp-wiring/universal/cycle-standard-mini-push-button-switch/

Pete60
05-21-2014, 5:10 PM
Torch, I'm new to the site, not electrical systems. A points system is based on an open ground....see diagram.The reason the switch works is because while one point is not grounded, the other is, and if you connect them while one is grounded, they both become grounded...or open simultaneously.If you think one set of points is ALWAYS grounded when the other set is open,you better think again.
When one set of points opens,the other set is NOT closed (but they will close 40 crankshaft degrees later).The AAU cam has 160 degrees dwell (only 86 degrees,if it's pre-'67 ;the one that melts pistons).For your plan to work,you'd need more than 180 degrees dwell and in that case one set of points could already be closed when the other set opens.

Why are you using 6V coils with points?You'd only use 6V coils if they're wired in series,like they are with EI.That way,the 6V coils get 6V each.

SamHain
06-19-2014, 7:34 PM
another kill question.

negative earth, boyer EI, boyer coil, no battery, micro switch via relay.

trying to grasp the relay. I'm thinking the completes power to the relay, thus connecting 30 to 87? in that case I'd put a ground on one end and the other to the coil- like so?

https://skatethrashbeer.files.wordpress.com/2014/06/img_0031.jpg?w=800


eta: changed my mind from coil+ to coil black wire.


ETA: this wiring worked out, just don't follow the drawing too closely, it should be the black coil wire, not the + wire at 87.

mandreas
02-02-2015, 5:04 PM
the correct kill switch wiring depends on if your bike is a negative or positive ground bike.

On a negative ground bike with an electronic ignition, the ground kill button just sends a continuous negative signal to the coil (same as the signal from the black wire on the brain box ) and kills the engine.

Tony, forgive me for digging through an old thread and looking for a little help (maybe even on the wrong thread!), but I just put one of your no battery kits in my '69 TR6 (it's the second one I've used; the first was on a '73 Bonneville and worked PERFECTLY from day one, thanks!) and for the life of me, I can't get the lights to work. I've got the LED headlamp bulb wired to a high/low switch (added to the headlamp housing). The bike is now a one-kick bike and it runs great, but no lights, front or rear. I'm certain I wired this according to your diagram, and can't imagine what if anything I did differently from the last bike. When it's running, what kind of reading should I be getting on a volt meter for the headlamp? Do you think I need to ground something not mentioned in your diagram? I'm out of ideas! Any help would be very appreciated. Thanks!

It might help to know that I'm not running the Pazon on this, though. I kept a Sparx e/i. Although I don't think that would have any effect.

Torch
02-03-2015, 8:25 AM
it's easy to see if you are missing a ground to the front and rear lights by taking a wire and connecting it to any good clean bolt on the engine and just touching it to the headlight bucket. if it lights up then your headlight is not grounding through the neck bearings.

same thing on the taillight.

but it could also be that by using an LED headlight and taillight there may be a load latching circuit inside the Boyer light delay box that needs to sense a load on the circuit to turn it on, try putting a regular old incandescent light on there and see what happens.

SamHain
02-03-2015, 8:32 AM
I've ran LED head and tail with a light delay and I did have a problem with them shutting off at low rpm.

mandreas
02-03-2015, 8:09 PM
Tony, thanks for the help! I put in an incandescent bulb and it lit right up. My question is, though, can I keep running it this way or should I switch back to an LED? There doesn't seem to be much dimming at idle even with the additional power draw. And if I do keep it, do you think I should run a fuse on the light?

But also, maybe the bigger question is, why is the Boyer doing this and how can I fix it?

Thanks again!

Speciman
02-04-2015, 3:31 AM
Hi Tony, Rob here. You had given a detailed explanation and I think, a diagram, in a previous thread you responded to some time last summer. After reading that, I went out and got an always open, two wire button switch and mounted it to my handlebars (like you said). I haven't hooked it up yet because the bike is still not assembled. Right now I still have the stock coils and points and won't change to an E/I until after the bike is assembled and running again for a while. So my starting point when installing the kill switch will be with points and a battery. I thought I understood your recommendation but this thread is getting a little confusing with all the different questions and topics being thrown at you and the level of detail you need to go into to explain the why's of it. It seems that everyone rather jump a thread instead of starting a new one. The confusing started when you brought up the wiring changes that Triumph was making that were year specific. I am not sure if this will affect the way you install the switch other than the fact that some years have a switch and others don't. You mention changes Triumph made in 69-70 and then 71. My bike is a 70, no kill switch. So does the wire from the switch to each point side of the coils still apply? And, is there a way to tell which terminal on the coil is the one that is wired from the points? I ask the latter because the wiring on the bike is not finished and I am not sure if I will be able to follow the wiring from the points to the coils yet.

Torch
02-04-2015, 10:38 AM
it looks like the Boyer "light delay power box" has a load sensing latch in the lighting circuit. don't worry about it if your bike does not have any problems producing the lighting power at idle then just put a regular incandescent bulb in either the taillight or headlight. ....

or if you really want to run both the LED headlight and taillight could put a small shunt loading resistor from the lighting circuit power wire to ground,... but that's getting a little complicated.

Torch
02-04-2015, 10:48 AM
the two wire (normally open) coil kill switch used on many type "C" bikes before 1970 just takes the correctly timed signal from each set of points telling each coil when to fire.... and connects them together so each coils gets a wrongly timed signal and thus, this kills the engine.

these wires from the kill switch should be connected to the same coil terminals as the black/white and black/yellow (points) wires are connected.

hope this helps Rob.

mandreas
02-04-2015, 11:18 PM
Thanks for the help, Tony! Since there's no problem with the incandescent headlamp, I'll just run it as is.

All the best!