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View Full Version : First Run, Very Bad Sound!!! Vid Included



unluckyluke
07-08-2017, 5:28 PM
Just did my rings and seals and slapped her back together. Ran great for 10 minutes was feeling pretty proud then this crazy whispy whistling scrapy sound started and then knocking on the inside as I got closer. Listen to VID.

https://youtu.be/cOlXwWnA6I4

Kicked her on for 10 seconds to make the vid then turned her back off and pushed her home!!!

Made sure I had oil coming back to the oil tank before I attempted riding. Oil did want to come out of the lid above the oil filter tho. All Rings were gapped to .020.

What is this sound? is it something commen? This bike has a s&s oil pump which was primed, New oil lines, fresh oil, oil cooler, and is a 1979 Shovelhead Motor. I must b the unluckiest Shovelhead owner!!! What a bummmmmmerrrrrrr

This was 10 minutes before!!! Was sounding great in my opinion!!!

https://youtu.be/wjwtw-MTn1U

hsoj74
07-08-2017, 6:28 PM
my buddies cone shovel made a sound like that before. It was the stator.

farmall
07-09-2017, 8:17 AM
First mentally review everything that was disturbed to perform your work.

I'd recheck valve adjustment.

Noises can have a combination of causes.

Did motorcycle run before you did the top end?

Good you for posting the video.

EDIT. I'd look in the timing chest since it's often the home of crunchy noises. You could pull a tappet block and if you've not inspected the cam and tappets that's always a good idea.

Does the noise change when you pull the clutch lever?

BTW I agree with inspecting the compensator, rotor and stator and everything else inside the primary because they are old and not necessarily because of the noise. It's the smart thing to do. That way you'll know what you have. When in doubt, inspect! If they are involved or not it's worth it. Remember to check the rotor for magnet shift and the regulator connector for any burns, corrosion, or oil. Dielectric grease applied to the joint will exclude moisture intrusion in future.

All Shovels are now ancient so when you get one it's not unreasonable to expect to rebuild the entire motorcycle. Most people don't warn others. I do. Antiques which have been ravaged for decades by backyard mechanics and not given the intensive periodic maintenance their designs require (British bikes are even worse, hence the death of their companies) need a lot of attention.

unluckyluke
07-09-2017, 9:22 AM
First mentally review everything that was disturbed to perform your work.

I'd recheck valve adjustment.

Noises can have a combination of causes.

Did motorcycle run before you did the top end?

I agree with inspecting the compensator, rotor and stator and everything else inside the primary because they are old and not necessarily because of the noise. It's the smart thing to do. That way you'll know what you have. When in doubt, inspect! If they are involved or not it's worth it. Remember to check the rotor for magnet shift and the regulator connector for any burns, corrosion, or oil. Dielectric grease applied to the joint will exclude moisture intrusion in future.

Good you for posting the video.

How do I check the rotor for magnet shift exactly? What does that mean?

Grease on the joint? What joint?

And what will damage burns or oil on the regulator connector tell me?

unluckyluke
07-09-2017, 9:23 AM
my buddies cone shovel made a sound like that before. It was the stator.

What happened to your buddies stator exactly for it to make this kind of noise? I'm trying to understand all possibilities here!!!

farmall
07-09-2017, 6:34 PM
You can look at the rotor from the inside after removing it. Magnet spacing should be identical with no chips or damage. The adhesive can break free permitting the magnet to move but of course the rotor rim keeps them from being spat out. They can, however, sometimes contact the stator.

Checking the electrical connector isn't related to the noise, but you want a clean connection and it's common for old connectors to be fucked up. There's a concept in aircraft inspections that you inspect the "general area" of any item you are inspecting to catch other potential problems and it's a very, very good idea anywhere. Dielectric grease the joint between the connector plug and socket. Just squeeze a small blob in there then put the plug back in. Dielectric grease fills the gaps to exclude intrusion of oil and moisture.

If something is hitting the stator it will show damage. Inspect everything you see inside the primary for looseness and damage. A loose compensator nut can cause some nasty noises though they usually make a loud knocking sound.