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oVoPicasso
07-10-2016, 4:30 PM
Noob here. I've got a 2002 Honda Shadow 600

Okay. Got some pictures. Do you guys see anything in these pics that I CAN remove or HAVE removed but shouldn't have? Been in the garage sweating my ass off here in AR.

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The below picture is from under the bike.

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sdustin
07-10-2016, 5:42 PM
What all is it you're trying to do?

oVoPicasso
07-10-2016, 8:41 PM
What all is it you're trying to do?

Well I'm bobbing the bike. No hardtail but just trying to get the bike looking as clean as possible. I want to get rid of all the unnecessary clunk. Tubes, wires, etc. Whatever I can take off the bike, I want to take off.

On the bike below, it looks like his carburetor doesn't have an air intake. Also, behind his fork/headlight, he took off the frame cover and there aren't NEAR as many wires/etc showing as my bike have. Any way to hide all this stuff without hardtailing the bike for additional room where the shock goes?



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3rdcoastthumper
07-10-2016, 11:00 PM
Well I'm bobbing the bike. No hardtail but just trying to get the bike looking as clean as possible. I want to get rid of all the unnecessary clunk. Tubes, wires, etc. Whatever I can take off the bike, I want to take off.

On the bike below, it looks like his carburetor doesn't have an air intake. Also, behind his fork/headlight, he took off the frame cover and there aren't NEAR as many wires/etc showing as my bike have. Any way to hide all this stuff without hardtailing the bike for additional room where the shock goes?



70933

You may want to read up and do some research. It all depends on what you want, need your bike to be. No-one can tell you how to build something that's gonna be for you. What do you like or dislike about the bike. Start with that before you start hacking it up. If you want it faster and louder than your gonna have to learn to tune your motor. If you want to make it look different, just decide what you want to and make it happen.

oVoPicasso
07-11-2016, 7:28 AM
You may want to read up and do some research. It all depends on what you want, need your bike to be. No-one can tell you how to build something that's gonna be for you. What do you like or dislike about the bike. Start with that before you start hacking it up. If you want it faster and louder than your gonna have to learn to tune your motor. If you want to make it look different, just decide what you want to and make it happen.

Touche. While I'm here, I've read a few places that it's possible to run the gas tube straight from the fuel shutoff valve to the carb (essentially bypassing the petcock)? Can someone fill me in?

Tattooo
07-11-2016, 7:36 AM
I've read a few places that it's possible to run the gas tube straight from the fuel shutoff valve to the carb (essentially bypassing the petcock)?

Why?????????

oVoPicasso
07-11-2016, 7:58 AM
Why?????????

Apparently the auto petcock is a recalled part. My reasoning is that if it's not NEEDED, I want to remove it. Going along with the OP.

Tattooo
07-11-2016, 12:17 PM
Apparently the auto petcock is a recalled part. My reasoning is that if it's not NEEDED, I want to remove it. Going along with the OP.

Cool...... But you are going to have a way to shut the gas off right???????

oVoPicasso
07-11-2016, 1:47 PM
Cool...... But you are going to have a way to shut the gas off right???????

Actually, I snapped off the fuel selector (weak pos) that attaches to the bottom of the gas tank... so I guess I need to find something to replace it. Any thoughts? The stock switch looked like hell anyways.

sdustin
07-11-2016, 9:10 PM
Broken petcock key? http://i1146.photobucket.com/albums/o528/sdustin/20150420_015511_zpsliaoifwx.jpg (http://s1146.photobucket.com/user/sdustin/media/20150420_015511_zpsliaoifwx.jpg.html)

sdustin
07-11-2016, 9:11 PM
http://i1146.photobucket.com/albums/o528/sdustin/20150420_015421_zpsmmhe4fb4.jpg (http://s1146.photobucket.com/user/sdustin/media/20150420_015421_zpsmmhe4fb4.jpg.html)

sdustin
07-11-2016, 9:18 PM
The long plastic key is easily forgotten and broke upon disassembly. Usually they are broke on the vlx especially if some one has taken them apart. As far as removing the original. Id just buy a new non vaccum petcock.

As far as removing stuff. Just remove anything that's not a involved in cooling the engine or making it fire. Then when you wire a new fuse block plan to wire in a headlight and tail light. Along with the fan and ingintion. It's actually not that hard. And look for videos from th brutal customs about what lines to plug and leave open on the carb after removingall the unneeded stuff.

oVoPicasso
07-22-2016, 6:52 PM
The long plastic key is easily forgotten and broke upon disassembly. Usually they are broke on the vlx especially if some one has taken them apart. As far as removing the original. Id just buy a new non vaccum petcock.

As far as removing stuff. Just remove anything that's not a involved in cooling the engine or making it fire. Then when you wire a new fuse block plan to wire in a headlight and tail light. Along with the fan and ingintion. It's actually not that hard. And look for videos from th brutal customs about what lines to plug and leave open on the carb after removingall the unneeded stuff.

Solid. That's what I've done. Question. Not sure what these connection points are called (Green, red, black, tan) but can they be scrapped any way? Trying to minimize the bulk right there somehow.

Thanks guys.

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sdustin
07-22-2016, 10:18 PM
All those connectors will be removed when you re wire. My advice is don't try to just take parts out of the wirring loom.
My advice is to completely go through it and take everything away. Then wire in a new fuse block. Then you can have excatly what you need. My first re wire was a vlx and it seems like it's a very hard thing but it's actually easy.

oVoPicasso
07-22-2016, 10:56 PM
All those connectors will be removed when you re wire. My advice is don't try to just take parts out of the wirring loom.
My advice is to completely go through it and take everything away. Then wire in a new fuse block. Then you can have excatly what you need. My first re wire was a vlx and it seems like it's a very hard thing but it's actually easy.

Yea It looks intimidating. Seems like there are a lot of wires going to all sorts of things. I didn't figure initially that the wiring on this bike would be or look so complex. Any advise on where to start is welcome.

oVoPicasso
07-23-2016, 12:16 PM
It's getting there. Slowly but surely. Here's a quick before and after. Still intimidated by the wiring though. Hah.

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3rdcoastthumper
07-23-2016, 5:26 PM
I used this article to wire my vt500c. Worked very well:

Motorcycle Wiring 101
Now that you have the essentials, letís get down to business.
Itís best to think of motorcycle wiring like a circle: Power leaves the battery from one terminal, passes through whatever will use that power (lights, horn, coil, whatever), and ends up back to the opposite terminal of the battery.
If that circle is ever broken, something wonít work. Hereís the basic step-by-step:
1. Connect the negative (-) terminal of the battery to a clean, bare metal part of the frame. Preferably this would be an engine mounting point. This makes the entire frame a grounding point so every light or accessory can be grounded anywhere on the frame to complete the circle of our electric circuit. On a kickstart only bike, this can be the same size as the other wires (14-16 gauge). If using electric start, it must be much thicker (4-6 gauge).
2. Connect the positive (+) terminal to an inline fuse holder. I prefer the newer blade style over the old glass tubes, and use between 20- to 30-amp fuses.
3. From the fuse holder, weíre running a wire to your ignition switch. It can be a keyed switch or just a toggle if youíre going to hide it somewhere discreet. Either way I recommend something that will handle at least 30 amps as all power to your electrical system is running through it.
4. Now that we have a way turn the power on and off, I like to run one power wire from the front of the bike to back. I call it the backbone. Every powered accessory will tap into this wire. In this case, start with the remaining wire from ignition switch and attach it to the backbone wire.
5. Attach the hot wire from the headlight to the backbone wire and ground the other wire to the frame. Do the same with the taillight.
6. Your front and rear brake light switches each have two wires. Attach one wire to the backbone wire and the other one to the third wire on your taillight (brake light wire).
7. Your coils should have two small input wires (in most cases). Attach one from each (if you have more than one coil) to the backbone wire. The remaining wire connects to your points or chosen electronic ignition. The thick wire with the cap goes to the spark plugóbut you already know that, right?
8. If youíre using electric start, connect one of the lugs of your starter solenoid to the positive (+) battery terminal with a 4-6 gauge wire. The other lug connects to the thick wire going to the starter. You also have two small wires or connector tabs on the solenoid. Connect one of these to the backbone wire and the other to your starter switch. Ground the other side of your starter switch to the frame if not already grounded through the handlebars.
9. Now for the charging system. Your new regulator/rectifier should have 3 yellow input wires. Connect these to the wires coming out of the stator (usually from the left side of the engine and the order doesnít matter). Connect the Red wire from the reg/rec to the positive (+) battery terminal and the green wire to the negative (-) terminal.
Some bikes, like CB750s, will have an additional white field coil wire bundled with the yellow stator wires. On bikes like this, the reg/rec will have additional wires that connect to the field coil wire and powered backbone wire. Be sure to check the instructions that came with your unit.
10. Thatís it! Turn the key, hit the starter button, and enjoy the sweet sound of success. You just rewired your bike!
Since this is just a basic system to get the bike running, Iíve left out things like turn signals, horn, and indicator lights. If youíd like to install these as well, just follow the same formula, power from the backbone wire, through your switch, and out to your light or accessory.
Lastly, you can wrap up your wiring masterpiece however you see fit. I like heatshrink tubing, but many people prefer to wrap using electrical tape or plastic wire looms.
Just remember to keep the wires secure and away from any sharp edges or heat sources. Broken or melted wires are the most common source of electrical failure I see.

oVoPicasso
07-23-2016, 6:59 PM
I used this article to wire my vt500c. Worked very well:

Motorcycle Wiring 101
Now that you have the essentials, let’s get down to business.
It’s best to think of motorcycle wiring like a circle: Power leaves the battery from one terminal, passes through whatever will use that power (lights, horn, coil, whatever), and ends up back to the opposite terminal of the battery.
If that circle is ever broken, something won’t work. Here’s the basic step-by-step:
1. Connect the negative (-) terminal of the battery to a clean, bare metal part of the frame. Preferably this would be an engine mounting point. This makes the entire frame a grounding point so every light or accessory can be grounded anywhere on the frame to complete the circle of our electric circuit. On a kickstart only bike, this can be the same size as the other wires (14-16 gauge). If using electric start, it must be much thicker (4-6 gauge).
2. Connect the positive (+) terminal to an inline fuse holder. I prefer the newer blade style over the old glass tubes, and use between 20- to 30-amp fuses.
3. From the fuse holder, we’re running a wire to your ignition switch. It can be a keyed switch or just a toggle if you’re going to hide it somewhere discreet. Either way I recommend something that will handle at least 30 amps as all power to your electrical system is running through it.
4. Now that we have a way turn the power on and off, I like to run one power wire from the front of the bike to back. I call it the backbone. Every powered accessory will tap into this wire. In this case, start with the remaining wire from ignition switch and attach it to the backbone wire.
5. Attach the hot wire from the headlight to the backbone wire and ground the other wire to the frame. Do the same with the taillight.
6. Your front and rear brake light switches each have two wires. Attach one wire to the backbone wire and the other one to the third wire on your taillight (brake light wire).
7. Your coils should have two small input wires (in most cases). Attach one from each (if you have more than one coil) to the backbone wire. The remaining wire connects to your points or chosen electronic ignition. The thick wire with the cap goes to the spark plug—but you already know that, right?
8. If you’re using electric start, connect one of the lugs of your starter solenoid to the positive (+) battery terminal with a 4-6 gauge wire. The other lug connects to the thick wire going to the starter. You also have two small wires or connector tabs on the solenoid. Connect one of these to the backbone wire and the other to your starter switch. Ground the other side of your starter switch to the frame if not already grounded through the handlebars.
9. Now for the charging system. Your new regulator/rectifier should have 3 yellow input wires. Connect these to the wires coming out of the stator (usually from the left side of the engine and the order doesn’t matter). Connect the Red wire from the reg/rec to the positive (+) battery terminal and the green wire to the negative (-) terminal.
Some bikes, like CB750s, will have an additional white field coil wire bundled with the yellow stator wires. On bikes like this, the reg/rec will have additional wires that connect to the field coil wire and powered backbone wire. Be sure to check the instructions that came with your unit.
10. That’s it! Turn the key, hit the starter button, and enjoy the sweet sound of success. You just rewired your bike!
Since this is just a basic system to get the bike running, I’ve left out things like turn signals, horn, and indicator lights. If you’d like to install these as well, just follow the same formula, power from the backbone wire, through your switch, and out to your light or accessory.
Lastly, you can wrap up your wiring masterpiece however you see fit. I like heatshrink tubing, but many people prefer to wrap using electrical tape or plastic wire looms.
Just remember to keep the wires secure and away from any sharp edges or heat sources. Broken or melted wires are the most common source of electrical failure I see.

Oh man, good looking article but after reading through... Still feeling like re-wiring this bike is beyond me. Done all the work myself up till now. May have to pay someone to rewire though hah.

oVoPicasso
07-24-2016, 8:37 AM
Woke up and re read this. It doesn't seem TOO hard. What gauge does the "backbone" wire need to be?

3rdcoastthumper
07-24-2016, 9:10 AM
I used 12ga because I had extra lying around.

mark83
07-25-2016, 7:25 PM
There's wiring diagrams in this site. Also, if you don't mind spending money, you can get an M-unit and rewire the bike. I don't know much about them, but from the videos I've seen they make wiring pretty easy while eliminating a few relays and crap. There's also a wiring kit you can buy for the unit. If you want to go it garage built, the wiring diagrams should do it. Just read a little on schematics so you get the symbols and shit. Then try, fuck up all weekend till it works. How I've learned what I know now which ain't jack shit.

sdustin
07-25-2016, 9:44 PM
It's not hard at all really. I split the harness keep all the connectors you HAVE to have and get rid of the rest. Add in the headlight brake light and fan everything else you use the factory connectors. It is not nearly as hard as you think. And that m-unit is overpriced for something you can do all on your own with a dude block from orileys

Mopar0422
02-03-2019, 3:14 PM
I honestly made this profile to say thank you for uploading this atricale. It is exactly what I needed to to wrap up my 2000 Honda Shadow vlx hard tail bobber.

Out of curiousity, how exactly did you splice your accessories to the back bone wire?

farmall
02-03-2019, 4:58 PM
Study proper wire splicing here and on Youtube, and avoid common auto store splices and crimpers. You have some searching to do and its worth it. Build yourself a basic wiring kit and it will serve you for life on more than motorcycles.

Welcome to Chop Cult.