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AndyLang09
04-21-2016, 12:17 AM
Hi all,

I'm rebuilding an 87' 1200xlh and looking at really cleaning up the front end. I'm stripping the whole bike back and going for a clean old school look.

I'm going to run a pair of Pangea Speed Airflow bars, with internal throttle body and now looking at the levers (probably heading towards Amal Type 534 Levers) and will need to run a remote master cylinder for the front disk brake (it's law to run a front brake over here in Aus) and have come across the eurocomponents master cylinder with lever and billet reservoir.

I was wondering if anyone knows of a similar product worth looking at, or have an opinion on using these? This is my first real build of this nature so just doing my research into the best way to tackle running a remote master cylinder.

Thanks in advance for any input.

53Bash
04-21-2016, 9:31 AM
I was wondering if anyone knows of a similar product worth looking at, or have an opinion on using these? This is my first real build of this nature so just doing my research into the best way to tackle running a remote master cylinder.

I'm using one because my bike came stock with it. 1981 Yamaha XJ750rh. The aftermarket ones seem about the same. Its really not a complex idea, you just have a cable moving the plunger (either directly for a pull stroke master, or via lever for a compression stroke master) instead of the lever moving it directly.

The same concerns apply regarding matching master to slave ratios, but in theory you can correct a mis-match by altering the cable pull rate, or the lever arm on the master, or some other leverage factor. That's what I'm counting on, since I will be switching from a single pot sliding caliper to dual double sided calipers. Buying an application-specific setup like the Euromasters one would hopefully avoid having to figure any of that out yourself, and give good performance right out of the box.

None
04-21-2016, 11:08 AM
The old Kawasaki Z1R used probably the neatest one ... cable to hidden master cylinder.

69077

So did some old 70s BMW twins, see

69076

Alternatively, I wonder why old Moto Guzzi dual link master cylinders aren't used more often, i.e. foot pedal operates rear disk and one front disk.

FabKev used a differnt Guzzi rear one to make up something like this what would work ... sure the idea has been around for a while.

Also, here (link) (http://www.kingdomofkicks.co.uk/remote-cable-operated-master-cylinder/).

69075

AndyLang09
04-21-2016, 11:48 PM
I'm using one because my bike came stock with it. 1981 Yamaha XJ750rh. The aftermarket ones seem about the same. Its really not a complex idea, you just have a cable moving the plunger (either directly for a pull stroke master, or via lever for a compression stroke master) instead of the lever moving it directly.

The same concerns apply regarding matching master to slave ratios, but in theory you can correct a mis-match by altering the cable pull rate, or the lever arm on the master, or some other leverage factor. That's what I'm counting on, since I will be switching from a single pot sliding caliper to dual double sided calipers. Buying an application-specific setup like the Euromasters one would hopefully avoid having to figure any of that out yourself, and give good performance right out of the box.

Thanks 53Bash, that helps clarify a few things i was pondering... Appreciate the input

AndyLang09
04-21-2016, 11:50 PM
The old Kawasaki Z1R used probably the neatest one ... cable to hidden master cylinder.

I'll have a look into something like this as an avenue, as 53Bash pointed out making sure you correct the mis-match is going to be tricky part...

woz
04-22-2016, 10:52 AM
I have seen a setup for a front brake where the guy used an internal throttle and have that cable go to the remote master, he had an internal throttle on the other side as well, suuuper cean

None
04-22-2016, 12:23 PM
I don't know the bore sizes for the Z1R or BMW units but they were both dual disk. The info should be out there somewhere.