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hellamopeds
03-16-2016, 10:12 AM
I am needing some advice on the most efficient way to build brackets. This is a crucial step in my fabrication progress so I would like to jump straight to doing it correctly. Right now I need to build a gauge bracket and fork-mounted headlight brackets. Any tips or suggestions would be very helpful.

My plan as of now:
Draw out brackets on sheet metal (Suggestions for thickness?)
Drill around the outline
Finish cut with angle grinder and dremel
Clean up the edges with a bench grinder (Need to purchase)

If this is stupid, let me know.

I do not have an air compressor setup yet. My lease is about to be up so I'm waiting until I find a new place to start that adventure.

jsaz666
03-16-2016, 12:06 PM
Get a good bandsaw and belt sander. It will pay off in the end. If you are looking for production do not skimp on equipment, you will buy it twice. Of you are like me and make stuff for yourself and occasionally a griend, trial and error and figuring out "how to" is half the fun! My high end setup consists of a scroll saw, sawsall, 4 1/2" angle grinder, file, drill (which combined with a file is my lathe) and a cheap assume Flux core wire welder from harbor freight. Have fun with it!

cggorman
03-16-2016, 1:46 PM
I did these from .050" 316 stainless using a band saw, belt sander, dremel, & hand drill. I did the pattern for these particular brackets in CAD but I've done many others using card stock, posterboard, cardboard, etc. Transfer pattern to metal, drill holes, cut to rough shape, finesse shape, bend, finish. For bending, I used a bench vise, various pieces of scrap plate, & a hammer. I also like to use seaming pliers for some things. I really need to buy/build a brake.

Personally, I like to go from paper to some super cheap metal (alum flashing, galv sheet, etc.) for the prototype before I make the finished part. Helps reveal problems before they get expensive.

Brazed, Sanded, blasted, waiting for paint.
http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c130/cggorman/Harley/IMG_20160314_213520_zpstpckpqfm.jpg (http://s26.photobucket.com/user/cggorman/media/Harley/IMG_20160314_213520_zpstpckpqfm.jpg.html)

aluminum prototype:
http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c130/cggorman/Harley/IMG_20160311_190030_zpsdzwfkbgo.jpg (http://s26.photobucket.com/user/cggorman/media/Harley/IMG_20160311_190030_zpsdzwfkbgo.jpg.html)

SamHain
03-16-2016, 9:43 PM
vertical bandsaw fucking kills it. belt sanders are nice too. grinder will do; cut off wheel/sanding discs... or flapper wheels if youre into that shit.

hellamopeds
03-17-2016, 11:03 AM
How much HP do I need on a band saw? What brands am I looking for (used)? I wouldn't feel comfortable spending over $300.

cggorman
03-17-2016, 11:54 AM
Shit, I'm just using a bench top saw for most of my sheet cutting. It's fractional HP at best. I don't remember the brand but it's comparable to what you would find at Northern Tool or HF. if you want to step up, Grizzly and Jet make solid units at fair prices. Sky's the limit from there. Make sure the table is big enough to handle the work you plan to do and make sure blades are easy to find.

StinkyPete
03-17-2016, 1:18 PM
I wouldn't feel comfortable spending over $300.

Look for a horizontal bandsaw that converts to upright cutting. They make or you can fab a little table for the upright operation.

Plus you can use it as intended on heavy bar stock and go get a coffee while it cuts.

cggorman
03-17-2016, 2:01 PM
Just made this with a band saw, belt sander, vice, a piece of pipe, and a hole saw. Whatcha waiting on, bro? Get to making! :)

http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c130/cggorman/Harley/IMG_20160317_155405_zpsowp4bfap.jpg (http://s26.photobucket.com/user/cggorman/media/Harley/IMG_20160317_155405_zpsowp4bfap.jpg.html)

vnygra
03-18-2016, 11:34 AM
vertical bandsaw fucking kills it. belt sanders are nice too. grinder will do; cut off wheel/sanding discs... or flapper wheels if youre into that shit.

And hand files! This is 3/16" stainless
<blockquote class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-version="6" style=" background:#FFF; border:0; border-radius:3px; box-shadow:0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width:658px; padding:0; width:99.375%; width:-webkit-calc(100% - 2px); width:calc(100% - 2px);"><div style="padding:8px;"> <div style=" background:#F8F8F8; line-height:0; margin-top:40px; padding:50.0% 0; text-align:center; width:100%;"> <div style=" background:url(data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAACwAAAAsCAMAAAA pWqozAAAAGFBMVEUiIiI9PT0eHh4gIB4hIBkcHBwcHBwcHBydr +JQAAAACHRSTlMABA4YHyQsM5jtaMwAAADfSURBVDjL7ZVBEgM hCAQBAf//42xcNbpAqakcM0ftUmFAAIBE81IqBJdS3lS6zs3bIpB9WED3YY XFPmHRfT8sgyrCP1x8uEUxLMzNWElFOYCV6mHWWwMzdPEKHlhL w7NWJqkHc4uIZphavDzA2JPzUDsBZziNae2S6owH8xPmX8G7zz gKEOPUoYHvGz1TBCxMkd3kwNVbU0gKHkx+iZILf77IofhrY1nY FnB/lQPb79drWOyJVa/DAvg9B/rLB4cC+Nqgdz/TvBbBnr6GBReqn/nRmDgaQEej7WhonozjF+Y2I/fZou/qAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC); display:block; height:44px; margin:0 auto -44px; position:relative; top:-22px; width:44px;"></div></div><p style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px; margin-bottom:0; margin-top:8px; overflow:hidden; padding:8px 0 7px; text-align:center; text-overflow:ellipsis; white-space:nowrap;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BCxo3H1ska_/" style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px; text-decoration:none;" target="_blank">A video posted by Vince Nygra (@vnygra)</a> on <time style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;" datetime="2016-03-10T14:18:52+00:00">Mar 10, 2016 at 6:18am PST</time></p></div></blockquote>
<script async defer src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js"></script>

cggorman
03-18-2016, 12:36 PM
Nice! I love stainless. I live in Ohio, so rust is my nemesis.

I can't seem to make anything without my handheld rotary tools. Die grinder and/or Dremel depending on how big the part is. I normally rough in an edge fillet like that with power tools, then hand file, then sanding. I hate that abrasives are so damned expensive. I really should buy in bulk.

triumphbruce
03-18-2016, 12:43 PM
I was a sheet metal mec on aircraft made all kinds of brackets
I moved to inspection years ago so I found a new way to make brackets
make a pattern take it to a s/m lead he gives it to a new kid
day or two later wammo new bracket
ya I am getting lazy in my old age

JWright
03-18-2016, 3:23 PM
if you get a band saw.... more/smaller teeth is good for light gauge, less/bigger teeth is for heavy stuff. I use a dewalt porta band and love it for all my projects. For the brackets you are talking about building I would suggest 14 or 16 ga. by the way I am a 13yr sheet metal fabricator and welder

StinkyPete
03-18-2016, 5:02 PM
I was a sheet metal mec on aircraft made all kinds of brackets
I moved to inspection years ago so I found a new way to make brackets
make a pattern take it to a s/m lead he gives it to a new kid
day or two later wammo new bracket
ya I am getting lazy in my old age

Damn - this is the way to go. You got someone building you mc brackets built to aircraft specs!