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BlackCloudSalvage
03-12-2016, 11:14 PM
I'm building my first rigid sportster which will have a chain. I've only been around a few rigids in person. In general... I haven't done much with any real rear end modification. Just curious...do you use a chain tensioner only in place of axle adjustment screws, which my axle plates have, or is there a benefit to having both or is that like wearing a belt with suspenders?

Sky
03-13-2016, 10:22 AM
Chain tensioners are for swing arm bikes with lots of suspension travel. Think dirt bikes.
No they are not used in lieu of axle adjusters. I have seen role type guides used in this way but...
Hardtails are supposed to be simple, imho. You won't need one.

chopperbob1313
03-30-2016, 10:41 AM
I would never build a bike without one. I wish my rigid had one. The chain gets loose or stretches at all and the chain starts going up and down in a hurry. I would only use the spring loaded type as they adjust to the situation where the non-spring type are more limited. On a long ride years ago I heard a noise and couldn't figure out what it was. Turns out the chain became loose and bit my fender and caused a crack across it. If my paint job wasn't so expensive I'd have one welded on now. A great invention in my opinion. Look at nitro drag bikes, they all use them.

Blackbetty
03-30-2016, 12:49 PM
I ran one on my first rigid and I'd never use one again. Noisy as hell, accelerated chain wear with sprocket type tensioners, when the chain stretches over time the weld on type tensioners can flip forward and you have to pull the wheel to reset. Unless you have some ungodly amount of stretch and need to tighten up the run, they're fluff pieces.

IMO it's a quick fix for fender/oil tank clearance issues for builders who did not factor in that wear ahead of time.

chopperbob1313
03-31-2016, 4:52 PM
Are they "fluff pieces" on drag bikes? Hardly. Don't know why it would be noisy unless you had one without bearings. As for chain wear why would a sprocket do that if it was lined up right? The one my buddy has is the skate board wheel type with bearings and I can't hear it when I ride next to him.It can't flip forward because there is a stop welded on it at about one o'clock, and that's as far forward as it can go. Sure works good for him and keeps his chain nice & snug however loose it is. Just sayin...

SlyJJ
03-31-2016, 9:21 PM
I have one on my rigid. Its hardly a "fluff" piece. It does a great job of taking the slack out of the chain. A loose chain is an ineffective chain. Now I will say there are those who put chain tensioners on their bikes because they perceive them as being fluff, but I'd say its up there with exhausts- they all serve a purpose, even if the rider is clueless as to how and why.....

Good investment nonetheless. Keeps my chain from smacking my fender.

BDCO
01-11-2017, 8:16 PM
I agree. The spring loaded tensioners would seem to extend chain and sprocket life to me. I'm building a rigid pan and want to run one. Bought a Monstercraftsman clamp on "Brutus" spring loaded unit. Too big. Won't clear the tire in the proper position on a straight leg replica frame. Looking for ideas.

BDCO
01-11-2017, 8:17 PM
What type are you running Sly?

SlyJJ
01-12-2017, 12:43 AM
Monster craftsman type- one with the sprocket for a 530 chain. Had to cut the end off and weld it to the frame. Had issues where the spring snapped, and then the "stopper" or whatever you want to call it snapped off. Quite unbecoming, but to his credit, the guy stood by his work and shipped out a new spring and even offered to ship out one of those brutus wheels, but we held off because we weren't sure it'd fit. Stand up guy- I'll get another from him come time to chop the shovel....

BlackCloudSalvage
01-12-2017, 9:22 AM
Glad to see this thread pop back up. It's just in time for me to decide. The bike is nearly all together and I could see it as a good additional support with the axle adjustment screws, otherwise I need to revise my current adjuster setup. I'm going to do some more research.

SlyJJ
01-12-2017, 1:23 PM
It'll certainly save several rear wheel adjustments with a rigid. If you've dropped a pretty penny on a rear fender and don't like the chain slapping it, it'll be a good investment. It'll also help it look much cleaner. All in all, not a necessity though...

BDCO
01-12-2017, 7:42 PM
I've called them and left a message. Also emailed. No reply yet. I have to say the tensioner appears to be very well built. I think I can make it work with t

Savwha
01-16-2017, 2:15 PM
I have always thought the same thing. Chain tensioners make sense on bikes with lots of rear travel but on why on a hard tail? so you can run a beat to shit chain and still keep it tight? IMO if the chain cant be adjusted properly through axle adjustment bolts then its time for a new chain.

SlyJJ
01-16-2017, 11:49 PM
I have always thought the same thing. Chain tensioners make sense on bikes with lots of rear travel but on why on a hard tail? so you can run a beat to shit chain and still keep it tight? IMO if the chain cant be adjusted properly through axle adjustment bolts then its time for a new chain.

Prevents slap from excessive chain movement. Even on a rigid I'm not going to have the chain be so tight so as to damage the trans so there is always just a little travel even when its properly adjusted. To top it off, I have to partially disassemble my exhaust to get to the rear axle nut when I'm adjusting for chain tension. Just having the tensioner really takes up a lot of the slack and if you've dropped a pretty penny on paint or powdercoat (I haven't) it may be more desirable.

Far from needed, granted- but I'd still say its worth it

Sabian
03-19-2017, 11:36 AM
Preference between a sprocket and wheel tensioner?