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View Full Version : Military: shipping, riding, selling bike overseas?



Tcmax
07-17-2014, 8:18 AM
Well just about done with my chopper and decided to have a change in my life by joining the Navy.

I asked to be stationed overseas in japan and they said the likelihood of getting that Is quite high.

My question is id like to be able to take my chopper with me. So has anyone had any experience shipping their motorcycle overseas? How's is getting it registered and the process in japan? If none of that works out, what about selling it overseas? Because I know the harley scene in japan is pretty good.

BuddhahoodVato
07-17-2014, 8:32 AM
Man, congrats.
Shipping a scoot will be no problem, your employer will handle that.
Selling her is another deal. Japon has stringteh rules regarding selling scoots.
If It's a old scoot [pre 1969], good money, newer scoots not so much.
Otra vez congrats, one of my buddies be in the Navy, he goes mainly to Europe, but he takes his Beemer with all the time.

farmall
07-17-2014, 10:33 AM
Excellent. Always think "career path", hang with smart people, don't get sucked into the "drunk and stupid" culture every service has but do have fun, and find Navy forums (I was USAF, different world) for detailed information.

This is a good time to join the Navy since the Pacific Pivot and current events mean it's the Naval turn at the funding rice bowl. Keep an eye out for tasty duty stations in NATO as well as the Pacific.
Rota is quite nice, for example, so have a variety of choices on your dream sheet. Small bases are often the best for knowing folks and quality of life. Enjoy being mobile and remember if you don't care for where you are, PCS can roll the dice and give new options.

Ask successful senior NCOs what the best moves are, preferably in front of other senior NCOs to get comparative info. Since a large percentage of you peers won't hustle (human nature) and plan for a career it's nice to see a new troop who gives a shit.

Do at least 20. Retiring in your forties and never having to work again (I did 26, dem pay bumps were worth it) is magnificent (and essentially Recession-proof) .

If you haven't gotten a guaranteed career field or choices (recent Navy vets can chime in on the best) then do that and under no fucking account go in general enlistment which lets the service pick your field.

Soak up training and schooling like a sponge. Let Uncle Sugar spend money on you. Degrees help with promotion and are important nowadays so start early, and don't be intimidated by school.

WARNING:

Not every Navy field deploys in a nautical environment. You do not fucking want a job which will make you vulnerable to Sand Box deployments on land other than gigs like aviation maintenance. Avoid combat engineering (for example) and for fucks sake check with serving sailors as well as vets to find the best gig you can.

The first job you get isn't a full-career commitment. Cross-training is fun and you get TDY pay to go to school again. Watch like a hawk for opportunities.

You can retake the ASVAB to boost your score. Consider the first time as practice.

Tcmax
07-17-2014, 8:59 PM
Thanks for the advice. Wondering if I can sell it for parts over there? Still considering bringing it with me because I don't have anyone here I trust to hold onto it

Tcmax
07-17-2014, 9:01 PM
Excellent. Always think "career path", hang with smart people, don't get sucked into the "drunk and stupid" culture every service has but do have fun, and find Navy forums (I was USAF, different world) for detailed information.

This is a good time to join the Navy since the Pacific Pivot and current events mean it's the Naval turn at the funding rice bowl. Keep an eye out for tasty duty stations in NATO as well as the Pacific.
Rota is quite nice, for example, so have a variety of choices on your dream sheet. Small bases are often the best for knowing folks and quality of life. Enjoy being mobile and remember if you don't care for where you are, PCS can roll the dice and give new options.

Ask successful senior NCOs what the best moves are, preferably in front of other senior NCOs to get comparative info. Since a large percentage of you peers won't hustle (human nature) and plan for a career it's nice to see a new troop who gives a shit.

Do at least 20. Retiring in your forties and never having to work again (I did 26, dem pay bumps were worth it) is magnificent (and essentially Recession-proof) .

If you haven't gotten a guaranteed career field or choices (recent Navy vets can chime in on the best) then do that and under no fucking account go in general enlistment which lets the service pick your field.

Soak up training and schooling like a sponge. Let Uncle Sugar spend money on you. Degrees help with promotion and are important nowadays so start early, and don't be intimidated by school.

WARNING:

Not every Navy field deploys in a nautical environment. You do not fucking want a job which will make you vulnerable to Sand Box deployments on land other than gigs like aviation maintenance. Avoid combat engineering (for example) and for fucks sake check with serving sailors as well as vets to find the best gig you can.

The first job you get isn't a full-career commitment. Cross-training is fun and you get TDY pay to go to school again. Watch like a hawk for opportunities.

You can retake the ASVAB to boost your score. Consider the first time as practice.

Dude appreciate the awesome advice. I'll definitely follow it. Scored a 85 on my asvab. I chose aecf as my rate. Decided to join after being a mechanic for eight years. Plan to be in for the long haul

farmall
07-17-2014, 10:45 PM
I had to Google it but looks like lots of tasty schooling out of the gate.

The military electronics world is fun (I was Comm/Nav on Phantoms and Broncos before crosstraining to engines to escape Moody AFB), and the fact you can already turn a wrench is a great advantage.

Might as well ship your ride. I haven't PCSed to Japan but in USAFE and Korea G.I.s basically either brought in vehicles or bought locally then sold to other G.I.s when they left. I'll assume you can do that but check with someone currently stationed there.

You'll also enjoy the considerable disposable income. Since all yer needs are taken care of even junior ranks have a considerable toy budget.

Asian poonanny is nice, but as old Sgt Cody wisely told me "Farmall, Asia is like Disneyland. Enjoy the rides but don't try to bring them home."

Cisco726
07-17-2014, 11:50 PM
Consider becoming a diver. They make bank in the civilian world. I wish I'd have taken advantage of my time in the army to learn some shit that would've helped me in the civilian world. Keep that in mind in your military career. When you retire from there you can start a new career and then double dip when you retire from that. Oh and if you work federal your time in counts towards your retirement from that as well.

NeoDutch
07-18-2014, 1:53 AM
There may be a caveat with service shipped vehicles that it may not be able to be sold overseas.

WingNut
07-18-2014, 3:28 AM
Lots of good info here. Farmall hit the nail on the head. The great thing about bikes is that they ship as household goods. As long as you're under your weight limit take as many as you want. Even as an E2 or E3 your weight limit will still be 5,000 or so pounds. I'm USAF stationed in Italy and I brought 2 bikes over. Insurance isn't really an issue. USAA takes good care of us. You do have to jump through hopes getting everything approved to ride and you'll have to pass a safety inspection including mirrors, lights and all that stuff. Young single and enlisted is a damn good life. Food and housing taken care of and I still made more money than my friends took home. When you go to boot camp keep your mouth shut!

Tcmax
07-18-2014, 6:47 PM
Thanks for all the awesome advice guys. Definitely looking forward to going and learning some new stuff. Travel the world and see what cool shit is everywhere. That's bad ass they ship the bikes as household goods. Guess the hard part would be making it legal( adding signals, horn and all that to a hardtail). I'll be going in as a e3 (college credits) so I know they are gonna give me shit in boot and because I'm older(24).

farmall
07-18-2014, 7:00 PM
That's all good fun though. Main thing is to see if you can wrap your head around repeatedly performing tasks correctly.

It ain't that ya fold a towel so it measures within 1/8", it's that you are cool with doing tasks precisely as specified by orders or technical pubs.

These classics were used in all services for many years:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PL57b4P0P5M

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q9sIT6P_05I

Misfitcj
07-19-2014, 7:29 AM
Pssst. I r active navy type. Hit me up via pm. I will shoot you my email. When are you headed to boot? Aecf? I think you fat fingered it. There is a bunch of info your missing. Drop me line an I will get you in the right direction