PDA

View Full Version : Any chop/change a inherited bike?



thegreathambino
06-09-2014, 8:19 PM
Has anyone here ever chopped or changed a bike they inherited from a family member?

I recently received a 2008 softtail custom after my dad died in a car accident. His bike is still currently being stored at my mom's house until I can get it moved up to MN.

I've been thinking about making some changes to the bike (different seat, bars, etc.), but part of me wants to leave the bike as it currently sits.
I don't think my dad would've been pissed if I made changes to it, but I'm torn because I feel like there is something to be said for keeping the bike the way he had it.

Anyone ever have a similar situation and what did you do?

Here is a pic of the bike
http://i1372.photobucket.com/albums/ag351/Joshua_Ladd/photo_zps2be514d0.jpg (http://s1372.photobucket.com/user/Joshua_Ladd/media/photo_zps2be514d0.jpg.html)

Rubman
06-09-2014, 8:44 PM
First and foremost, my most sincere condolences to you and your family on the loss of your father. That's a fucking bummer.

At the same time, none of us can tell you what the right thing to do with that bike would be. My personal opinion is if it were a modified classic that someone clearly put a lot of time and effort into making their own, I'd be wary about changing it.

But that's a bone stock soft tail. I don't think your dad would mind/would've minded you making it YOURS. I think that, in this particular case, you should focus less on what you do TO the bike and more on what you do WITH the bike; where you ride with the bike, how often you ride the bike, and how you act on the bike. Make sure the miles you put on it and the man you are as you sit on it properly reflect what your old man would have wanted from his son. Either way, enjoy it.

That's just my .02. Sorry again.

Beefdrippings
06-09-2014, 8:49 PM
Not much else I can add after that other than if you're not going to ride/enjoy it in it's current state maybe a change up isn't a bad thing.
Totally your call and no one should give you grief either way.Sorry for your loss.



First and foremost, my most sincere condolences to you and your family on the loss of your father. That's a fucking bummer.

At the same time, none of us can tell you what the right thing to do with that bike would be. My personal opinion is if it were a modified classic that someone clearly put a lot of time and effort into making their own, I'd be wary about changing it.

But that's a bone stock soft tail. I don't think your dad would mind/would've minded you making it YOURS. I think that, in this particular case, you should focus less on what you do TO the bike and more on what you do WITH the bike; where you ride with the bike, how often you ride the bike, and how you act on the bike. Make sure the miles you put on it and the man you are as you sit on it properly reflect what your old man would have wanted from his son. Either way, enjoy it.

That's just my .02. Sorry again.

SquashThatFly
06-09-2014, 8:51 PM
I know my father would just be happy the bike was getting ridden and that I was the one enjoying it, regardless of what modifications i made to it.

ChampCo
06-09-2014, 9:03 PM
First and foremost, my most sincere condolences to you and your family on the loss of your father. That's a fucking bummer.

At the same time, none of us can tell you what the right thing to do with that bike would be. My personal opinion is if it were a modified classic that someone clearly put a lot of time and effort into making their own, I'd be wary about changing it.

But that's a bone stock soft tail. I don't think your dad would mind/would've minded you making it YOURS. I think that, in this particular case, you should focus less on what you do TO the bike and more on what you do WITH the bike; where you ride with the bike, how often you ride the bike, and how you act on the bike. Make sure the miles you put on it and the man you are as you sit on it properly reflect what your old man would have wanted from his son. Either way, enjoy it.

That's just my .02. Sorry again.


Sorry for your loss my man.

Well said Rubman. Nice to see a decent post on here once in a while.

KILLBILL91
06-09-2014, 9:20 PM
In my opinion, I feel making changes such as bars, seat, etc. aren't really chopping/changing the bike to a drastic extent. They are just simple changes you make to your liking or comfort level that can always be reverted to original with a few wrench turns. Now if you were changing up the gas tank, cutting fenders, chopping at the frame, that would be a bit more drastic from my standpoint. Either way sorry for your loss man but just enjoy the bike!

thegreathambino
06-09-2014, 9:29 PM
You guys are all great. Thank you for the input!

JamesM
06-09-2014, 9:31 PM
I can't imagine losing my father, but if he rode, and had a bike that ended up being mine I would still chop the shit out of it and he would have expected it. Very sorry for your loss man.

Clockwork444
06-09-2014, 10:03 PM
sorry for your loss. Here is my dad's bike. He bought it new in 1975. My mother and my father rode it when they were 22 from MN up into canada and back for about a 2000 mile trip. they rode quite a bit back in the day. Dad is still with us, but mom passed about 17 years ago. When i got the bike it was stored for 20 years. dad gave it to me on my 22nd birthday. i am 29 now and i have slowly made changes. now it is in pieces, something went in the engine and it started to burn down. caught it in time to do a mild rebuild on it but i still dont know why it burned up. metal shavings everywhere in the filters. anyways.... i started to cafe it out and dad didnt mind. as long as it runs and i enjoy it, he likes the changes. i am deleting the blinkers and doing a cafe fairing on it. however i plan to keep all the stock stuff so i can keep it in restored condition if i want to go that way as well. i told dad about the cafe seat i want to add and he seemed to like the idea. i think your dad would like if you made her yours and enjoyed her as he once did.

heres a few crappy pics of my ride. i also have a pic of me on it at 2 years old, and dad framed me a pic from 75' of my mom sitting on her. that one brought a tear to my eye

<a href="http://s1332.photobucket.com/user/Clockwork444/media/IMG_03311_zps596c19e9.jpg.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://i1332.photobucket.com/albums/w611/Clockwork444/IMG_03311_zps596c19e9.jpg" border="0" alt=" photo IMG_03311_zps596c19e9.jpg"/></a>

in the background she sits in stock form. doesnt do it justice

<a href="http://s1332.photobucket.com/user/Clockwork444/media/AAAD2A76-FFCE-45A6-A9F0-D40D2115503F_zpsqqzo1zu6.jpg.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://i1332.photobucket.com/albums/w611/Clockwork444/AAAD2A76-FFCE-45A6-A9F0-D40D2115503F_zpsqqzo1zu6.jpg" border="0" alt=" photo AAAD2A76-FFCE-45A6-A9F0-D40D2115503F_zpsqqzo1zu6.jpg"/></a>

Scar55
06-09-2014, 10:36 PM
I can't add anything to this except my condolences. I had the same concerns after I inherited my son's bike when he passed. I know he would just want me to do what ever I felt I wanted. I eventually sold the bike and it was a difficult decision but I knew he didn't care. I don't need the bike to remind me of him. I did keep his truck and his brother and I fixed it up and his nephew will drive it when he is 16. Make the bike yours. I'm sure your father would want that. You will think of him every time you ride it and that's what he would want.

Kelly

paybacks01
06-09-2014, 10:37 PM
I inherited my fathers bike after he was killed in an accident. I didn't want to see his bike end up in a scrap yard so I took it from the insurance co. Once I got it home I tore the front end off and all the other damaged parts. It was tough to look at it all wrecked. I let the bike sit like that for a while. I'd just stare at the bike and think about shit. After some time passed I got it back on the road. With the exception of some minor changes, it looked pretty close to how he had it. A lot of people thought it was weird that I was riding the bike that my dad was killed on but for me its a way to connect to him I guess. Eventually I couldn't look at or ride the bike without thinking about the accident. I think becoming a father myself changed my perspective. After much thought and debating I tore it down to the frame and started making it my own, kind of a second chance for it I guess.
Rubman's words are how I feel about my dads bike and what I want to do with it. For me I had to make it look different to get the accident out of my head.
Whatever you decide, enjoying the bike and remembering your father is what matters. Sorry for your loss man.

shovelpan69
06-09-2014, 10:48 PM
Been there man, I got mine from my dad and it was in a thousand pieces, I know my dad wanted me to learn to build things and I never took the time to learn while he was here so I like to think me figuring things out is him teaching.

farmall
06-09-2014, 11:04 PM
My condolences, and be thoughtful in how you work through your loss. Bereavement will change you, but in what ways is up to you.

I inherited my late wifes Shovel, but she built it as I prefer. It will stay that way for now but I'll eventually give it a makeover when the paint gets worse.

The objects our dead leave us can be precious because of the memories they evoke. If you are left a thing you can enjoy using more with some mods, have at it. I want my survivors to enjoy what I leave them, and to turn a dollar on what they won't use.

Take pics of the stocker (in later years what even mundane pics evoke will surprise you), then make it yours and ride the hell out of it.

Perhaps when you pass it on someone else will remember you and smile.

Arsenal
06-10-2014, 4:05 AM
Farmall and Rubman got it covered as usual. I know from personal experience that it doesn't really matter but I'm sorry for your loss. What I would give to have my dads bike....

http://i.minus.com/jbg8ke3xxW7nXy.png (http://minus.com/i/bg8ke3xxW7nXy)

71butcher
06-10-2014, 4:52 AM
my sincere condolences on your father.

I lost my pops in a car accident when i was 18, i was a senior in high school.
i inherited his 82 FXR, i rode it the first summer but drained the fluids and parked it that fall.

It sat for over 10 years before id mess with it.

I had other bikes, harleys included in that time. but when i decided to get it out and start waking it up. I thought id left alot of grief behind, but youll be suprised the stuff you remember when wrenching on a loved ones bike. especially when its something they did alot of work on. or have adjusted to their height/reach. There are alot of things id like to do to this bike; fairing, keystones, 2-1 etc. but its hard man. its all in how well your dealing with it man. its never easy. but these guys got it right


dont think of it as butchering his bike. youll be paying tribute to him by enjoying his bike the way you want it so that you will enjoy it as much as he did. watch him grin when you duck a little, drop a gear and twist the wick. 48864

Blackbetty
06-10-2014, 8:12 AM
Dude...

Honor his memory by making a SWEET CHOPPER

mountainryder
06-11-2014, 6:41 PM
Sorry about your Dad, it sucks, I know. I lost my Dad 5 years ago, and he left me his 1939 Harley ULH (BT flatty). I rode it a few times, then parked it in my shop. I sat and stared at it every day, for about 3 years, thinking about stuff. He knew I was going to get it someday, and he knew I would fuck around with it because that is how he taught me to be. It was already far from stock the way he built it, I just took it in a slightly different direction. I decided to only un-bolt some stuff, bolt on different stuff (no cutting/welding), so I could put it back the way it was. I plan on keeping this bike for the rest of my life, so it may evolve more later.