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BurnoutNova
05-19-2014, 11:42 AM
Has anyone here had bad luck with any certain tires having trouble?

Saturday I attempted a 200 mile ride and about 50 miles from home my brand new shinko 270 5.00 -16 shredded one row of tread off of it. It beat the hell out of my fender as it came off. I had it set at 30 psi, and it wasn't rubbing on anything so I don't think I did anything wrong.

I'm a little leary about replacing it with the same thing... so I thought I'd ask and see what everyone thinks.

IndianaSlim
05-19-2014, 6:28 PM
I never buy cheap tires. Only got two of them!

surfbum
05-19-2014, 6:52 PM
I put about 200 miles on my Shinko 270 this weekend. Any tire can fail

FooDog
05-19-2014, 7:39 PM
I agree with spending $$$ on good tires.

rooster52478
05-19-2014, 8:11 PM
I've put thousands of miles on Shinko tires of all types with no problems at all. As fast as I go through them I don't buy high dollar tires.

Clockwork444
05-19-2014, 11:33 PM
well they wouldnt replace your fender, they cant replace your life, but they should replace your tire.

take a quick look at the date stamped into the tire, regardless of if you just bought it. most tires are on a 4-7 year "expiration" date and if it is one that sat on a shelf for years (unlikely) the oils in the rubber start to dry out and break down and will make the rubber brittle etc etc im not a tire expert but this is pretty common knowledge. i would at least get ahold of who you bought the tire from and make them replace it

Knuckleduster
05-20-2014, 5:55 AM
Your life depends on your tires, don't skimp on shit your life depends on!

BrokenSprocketGarage
05-20-2014, 5:58 AM
I've put thousands of miles on Shinko tires of all types with no problems at all. As fast as I go through them I don't buy high dollar tires.
If you bought a higher quality tire, you would not need to replace them so often.
I am seeing high mileage from the Metzeler 888, Dunlop Elite 3, and Michelin Commander II on my customers bikes. As in 10,000 miles on a heavy touring bike and showing VERY little wear.
I understand wanting a vintage or custom look. The Shinkos are all about being cheap and looking vintage.

rooster52478
05-20-2014, 7:57 PM
If you bought a higher quality tire, you would not need to replace them so often.
I am seeing high mileage from the Metzeler 888, Dunlop Elite 3, and Michelin Commander II on my customers bikes. As in 10,000 miles on a heavy touring bike and showing VERY little wear.
I understand wanting a vintage or custom look. The Shinkos are all about being cheap and looking vintage.

Stunts my man. Burnouts, wheelies, jumping it, etc.. Shinko 777's get great reviews, they handle great, are sticky enough for wheelies, and I get a set for $110. Can't go wrong.

wymple
05-20-2014, 8:48 PM
If you bought a higher quality tire, you would not need to replace them so often.
I am seeing high mileage from the Metzeler 888, Dunlop Elite 3, and Michelin Commander II on my customers bikes. As in 10,000 miles on a heavy touring bike and showing VERY little wear.
I understand wanting a vintage or custom look. The Shinkos are all about being cheap and looking vintage.

Not necessarily. It depends on the rubber compound. Some better tires are soft grip for traction and wear out very fast. Some cheap tires are a hard compound, less traction but long life. I run what I can afford, always have. Just know the limits of the tire you buy for traction, mostly concerned with wet roads.

Sky
05-20-2014, 11:45 PM
Nothing wrong with an inexpensive tire. If you've got the right tire for your application.
Ever put avons on a heavy bike? wear out in a jiffy. And touring tires don't belong on lightweight chops.
Only seen two outright new tire failures in ten years of putting 'em on bikes pretty much daily. One dunlop and one metzler. Neither company would honor the warranty, btw.
Nylon Tires like the "cheap" shinkos seem to last forever.
Are you sure nothing else contributed to the failure? Maybe a too long seat bolt with lowered shocks or the like? Improper beading or inflation? It would suck to ruin a second tire without double checking.

Ato
05-21-2014, 4:55 AM
Stunts my man. Burnouts, wheelies, jumping it, etc.. Shinko 777's get great reviews, they handle great, are sticky enough for wheelies, and I get a set for $110. Can't go wrong.

Long live the wheelies on my IG feed.

BurnoutNova
05-21-2014, 9:45 AM
I thought I must have had something rubbing on the tire to... I happened to have ran through some mud first thing out on the road that day, and the inside of the fender has a perfect layer of mu water with no rubbing marks at all. Nothing was rubbing. This is on a 79 shovel with a FL rear fender. There is plenty of room between the swingarm and the tire, I scratched my head for a while before I posted this.

I also had the pressure set at 30 psi. That should be about right... right?

Grantman
05-21-2014, 12:53 PM
well they wouldnt replace your fender, they cant replace your life, but they should replace your tire.

take a quick look at the date stamped into the tire, regardless of if you just bought it. most tires are on a 4-7 year "expiration" date and if it is one that sat on a shelf for years (unlikely) the oils in the rubber start to dry out and break down and will make the rubber brittle etc etc im not a tire expert but this is pretty common knowledge. i would at least get ahold of who you bought the tire from and make them replace it

I got a set of Avons from J&P. Had to have the rear one replaced with less than 300 miles on it because it was all dried out and looked 20 years old. The front one is still on the bike and looks new (at about 3K miles) Had to buy another tire so I could ride while J&P looked at the tire. Got a full refund including shipping both ways! I wish I'd have known about the date code on the tire!

davidabl
05-21-2014, 9:29 PM
On the other hand, J&P shouldn't have sold it to you in the first place. And you should have sent it back w/o mounting it.

Sky
05-22-2014, 6:00 AM
38-42 rear with stock shocks
30-32 with lowered or stiff shocks
30 is the lowest I would go tubeless
20-28 rigid or struts with a tube

BrokenSprocketGarage
05-22-2014, 6:02 AM
Stunts my man. Burnouts, wheelies, jumping it, etc.. Shinko 777's get great reviews, they handle great, are sticky enough for wheelies, and I get a set for $110. Can't go wrong.
Ha, point taken.
Pictures or it didn't happen!!

BurnoutNova
05-22-2014, 8:45 AM
38-42 rear with stock shocks
30-32 with lowered or stiff shocks
30 is the lowest I would go tubeless
20-28 rigid or struts with a tube

Yeah I have short shocks on it... and I had it set at 30. That is good to know I will set the new one at 30 as well.

Thanks all for the input

JonMcd
05-22-2014, 9:19 AM
I got a little over 7k miles on a shinko 240. Decided to try a 270 and it wore alot faster. Hasn't came apart yet though. The compound is a good bit softer on the 270. I've been seeing a website that has both of those tires for around 75 bucks. Out of date overstocks maybe?

Grantman
05-22-2014, 12:34 PM
On the other hand, J&P shouldn't have sold it to you in the first place. And you should have sent it back w/o mounting it.

It looked good when it was mounted, couple weeks later looked like it had gone through hell.

rooster52478
05-22-2014, 1:41 PM
Ha, point taken.
Pictures or it didn't happen!!

Check out the wheelies/bunouts thread. The last page.

farmall
05-22-2014, 3:58 PM
Expendable tires are nice for burnouts. Back in the '80s Cheng Shins were sticky enough that customers would insist on them for budget street racing. You could literally rub a cold tread with your thumb and rubber would roll off like a gum eraser.

In normal riding use I found out long ago cheap tires become expensive (time is money too) over doing many more tire changes. I put Dunlops or Avons even on my beater Jap bikes and it paid off. I mount my own tires but don't particularly care to do it more often. I just watched my tread wear and set aside da cash in advance. I also don't re-use streetbike tubes on the street. You certainly can but preventive maintainence doesn't mean "run until failure".

Cheap tires ain't really likely to kill or maim you, but they annoy me so I don't run them on the street.

If your ride takes any standard Harley sizes there are often nice takeoffs on Craigslist, with or without rims. I like it when rich folk sell their leftovers.

BurnoutNova
06-30-2015, 1:33 PM
BUMP

A friend just had the same thing happen with a shinko 270. He bought his over 1 year after I did, from a different supplier. I dont know what the date was on it but this is starting to seem like it isnt a fluke.

HMMMM

bobscogin
06-30-2015, 3:35 PM
I got a little over 7k miles on a shinko 240. Decided to try a 270 and it wore alot faster. Hasn't came apart yet though. The compound is a good bit softer on the 270. I've been seeing a website that has both of those tires for around 75 bucks. Out of date overstocks maybe?

I just bought a pair of Shinko 270's whitewalls last week. $82 each shipped. DOT date code says they were made 49th week of last year, so about 6 or 7 months old. Definitely not old stock.

Bob

bobscogin
06-30-2015, 3:58 PM
Something for consideration-- The Shinko 270 5.00-16 is a copy of the Goodyear Super Eagle. I checked a 1959-1969 FLH manual, the era during which those tires were fitted. The recommended tire pressures for the 5.00-16 is: Solo rider 12 psi front, 18 psi rear, Rider and one passenger, 12 psi front 20 psi rear. Since the technology and design of this tire is the same as it was back then, I plan to adhere to those pressure recommendations. When I see people recommending much higher pressure, such as around 30 psi, I have to believe current tire technology thinking is being applied to these tires and they're being over inflated. As I said, just something for consideration.

Bob

BurnoutNova
09-26-2015, 10:42 AM
64090

BurnoutNova
09-26-2015, 10:43 AM
64091

BurnoutNova
09-26-2015, 10:43 AM
This tire was ran at about 15psi

slinginrods
09-26-2015, 7:00 PM
Well that was a failure for sure. Been in the tire business for about 30 years and that was either a result of the low pressure or an old tire or a combination of both. Classic bias ply failure

BurnoutNova
09-28-2015, 7:21 AM
The funny thing is both shinko tires that have failed were new, with new DOT dates on them and the swing arm bike (mine) was run at 30psi as recommended, and then the one by friend has on his rigid was run at 15psi (which is what lots of guys say to do).

I conclude that these tires are dangerous and nobody should run them. Maybe they were better in the past, but not any more.