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selectedgrub
12-31-2012, 8:46 PM
I was curious after reading a post on another forum
(They don't really tolerate thread jacking or off topic....)

This guy had a righteous ride and posted how he got it published in a mag
Real nice bike, stunning photography and a pleasing to the eye model.
But...
I was under an impression that a publishing house would supply a pro photographer, pay for a model, hairdresser make up costumes etc. They would cover expenses, lighting rigs, lunch, drinks transportation of the motorcycle to a suitable location blah blah blah.
Then maybe slip you 500notes for your trouble.
This is not the case?. You have to fork out for all these expenses?

Then you forward these pictures to the mag, who then owns them?
...and decides weather your effort was worthy to grace their pages?
Is this the standard.
I'm kinda shocked. Does anyone have experience in this who would like to elaborate or maybe a member associated with a magazine?

Rubman
12-31-2012, 8:54 PM
most "publishing house" magazines are cock suckers. that's just my own personal experience working with the ones that i have. to the extent which you describe, however.. I'm not sure. I wouldn't say they suck THAT bad; more like that guy REALLY wanted to have his bike immortalized in the pages of chopper history, and had the dough to make it an easy decision for the magazine's editors.

ugotbit
12-31-2012, 9:31 PM
I know what your talking about and thought the same exact thing.

I guess you can buy your way in now a days. Think of all the money the mag saved, all the leg work was done for them. All they did was regurgitate the pics and info into print.

IMO getting a bike or car into a mag is the ultimate "you made it" Being recognized by your "piers" and showcased for your creation.

Pendulum
12-31-2012, 9:42 PM
I'm an automotive photographer, and I've shot for a couple big magazines. I've also assisted on shoots and have friends that regularly shoot for some of the biggest car magazines around. That said, I don't have any 1st hand experience with shooting bikes, but here's how it usually goes down for a typical magazine shoot...


Someone from the mag, or a photographer that has a relationship with the mag, will see your car/bike/prince albert/whatever somewhere. Maybe it's at a show, maybe on a forum like this, maybe at Starbucks. If it's a photographer that finds it/you, they'll usually be your point of contact for the whole thing. Once the editor agrees that they're going to pay the photographer, he'll set everything up. My clients never want to put up the budget for a model, and I don't like mixing models + cars, so I almost always skip that... Basically I find a location, work out a time w/ the vehicle owner, and shoot the car. Then I send it off to the magazine along w/ all the info I have on the car and owner, and a writer or the mag editor will contact the owner. They tag team the article, and a few months later you're on a news stand at the grocery store. A few months after that, I get my check from the magazines publishing company.

If it's magazine staff that finds you, then they'll work with you on everything and just get us in touch so we can arrange a shoot. The rest of the process is the same.

I've only ever had ONE vehicle owner pay me, instead of the magazine. He actually sought me out, paid me, etc. So, maybe that's how some smaller mags do it... Can't say for sure. Also, there are TONS of bullshit ways to get your car/bike into a mag. Especially in the niche that I work in... It sucks, but for every 5 cars I shoot at least 1 guy is like "Oh yeah, this is my 7th or 8th feature car..." because what they do is rub elbows w/ editors, and basically get the homie hookup on every car they build.

RetroRob
12-31-2012, 9:52 PM
I just went through all this so maybe I can shed some light. I've never solicited any mag to get my bike in it. I posted some pics here and JJ, and was contacted by one of their editors. They asked for high res pictures and a thousand word write up. I went all out, hired a model, scouted a location and had a good friend shoot the pics. I wrote the article, they published it without any changes.

I didn't receive any payment, nor did I expect any. I was thrilled to be asked. Most Magazines these days are holding on by a thread like so mant businesses in the digital age, just like TV, there are a million production companies and everybody making less and trying to stay afloat.

ugotbit
12-31-2012, 10:06 PM
I just went through all this so maybe I can shed some light. I've never solicited any mag to get my bike in it. I posted some pics here and JJ, and was contacted by one of their editors. They asked for high res pictures and a thousand word write up. I went all out, hired a model, scouted a location and had a good friend shoot the pics. I wrote the article, they published it without any changes.

I didn't receive any payment, nor did I expect any. I was thrilled to be asked. Most Magazines these days are holding on by a thread like so mant businesses in the digital age, just like TV, there are a million production companies and everybody making less and trying to stay afloat.

Thanks for jumping in Rob.

I'm not taking anything away from your ride, it's fucking bad ass and deserves to be in the mag.

Again, congrats on "making it'

Pendulum
01-01-2013, 9:30 AM
[...] Most Magazines these days are holding on by a thread like so mant businesses in the digital age, just like TV, there are a million production companies and everybody making less and trying to stay afloat.

So true. I've seen my checks get smaller and smaller, and I have more and more competition. Not that the money is why I shoot, but when I've got $15k in photography gear at a shoot, I have to be getting paid unless you're a really good friend. The insurance to cover my gear and protect me from a lawsuit if something happens isn't cheap lol.

Congrats Rob.

Warejn
01-01-2013, 11:43 AM
Yep, I actually went to college and got a degree in photojournalism in the 90's. I spent many years as a photographer. Now days its a different market. I still shoot as a side job but the days of giant expense accounts and huge budgets are few and far between. Especially when it comes to choppers and hot rods.

vetto
01-01-2013, 11:56 AM
So to answer Grub's question, it seems like small mags (gkm, low side, dice, etc) prefer the self published photos and write-up? I have read this before in another thread, and have seen it happen. Larger circulation mags do it all? I don't think the bike owner gets paid in either case., I could be wrong.

Warejn
01-01-2013, 1:10 PM
Yep, that has been my experience. Even some of the big ones (cheazy rider and such) don't kick down cash to the owner of the bike. The builder will hopefully get some biz out of the spread, the photographer gets a bit as well as the model.

There is not much money to be made in it. A shit ton of fun but not cash.

selectedgrub
01-01-2013, 1:22 PM
Thanks for the clarifications.
A reply on the other site, from what I read he is maybe the editor?
You don't have to have a model.
Who owns the photos once they have been uploaded if you were to use a pro photographer?
3 years later they could be printed on a T Shirt or used to sell the tyre or bars that you run?

Drewwoods
01-01-2013, 1:47 PM
My buddy is a photographer for PVW a VW mag. How it works for him is if he finds a car he thinks is worthy of a feature, he shoots it and sends the pictures to the editors, if its featured they send him a check. He can leave the pictures raw or edit them, it's a fairly easy process for him., not sure how other magazines are.

vetto
01-01-2013, 4:27 PM
A friend of mine shot for easy rider once, he said they own the pics that make it to press. The rest of the submissions on a spread he still retains rights to. The hitch is you don't know what pics they will choose until it gets on the news stand. So he has to keeps all the pics private until he knows which are still his and which ones are theirs.

But seriously Grub, your handmade bike should be a magazine's dream! Even the closeups are righteous and worthy of a multi Page spread! Get busy on the write up and story and send it in!
All you small format quarterly publishers, are you reading this? You HAVE to run Grub's bike!

NeoDutch
01-01-2013, 5:22 PM
Don't forget you can add some dinah to your selling price by having your sled in a rag, especially if some dude in a flannel and vans wants to buy it. Instacred.

OhioFlameThrower
01-01-2013, 6:03 PM
I just went through all this so maybe I can shed some light. I've never solicited any mag to get my bike in it. I posted some pics here and JJ, and was contacted by one of their editors. They asked for high res pictures and a thousand word write up. I went all out, hired a model, scouted a location and had a good friend shoot the pics. I wrote the article, they published it without any changes.

I didn't receive any payment, nor did I expect any. I was thrilled to be asked. Most Magazines these days are holding on by a thread like so mant businesses in the digital age, just like TV, there are a million production companies and everybody making less and trying to stay afloat.

My experience having my bike in a major magazine went exactly the same route. had a friend shoot the pics (I paid for the processing) and my wife asked our young boys' pre-school reacher to model (my wife gave her a gift card for her efforts).

I believe the "feature" bike in some mags are shot by the magazine's photographer using a magazine-supplier mode, but most of the phot-shoots in the mags are as stated above.

Here are a couple of my pics....

www.flamethrowercustoms.blogspot.com
www.flamethrowercustoms.com

http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i294/OhioFlameThrower/Processed_MG_1476.jpg

http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i294/OhioFlameThrower/Processed_MG_1462.jpg

AlexK
01-01-2013, 7:38 PM
Teachers never looked like that when I was in school.

irishrich317
01-01-2013, 9:44 PM
I've had 8 bikes featured in magazines, and have never paid to have somebody shoot the photos. All have been shot by photographers associated with, or assigned by the respective magazines. If I wrote the feature article to go along with the photos, I was paid by the magazine to do the word article. I've only had a model in one photo shoot, and the guy who I built the bike for paid her modeling time.

The only magazine that wanted me to pay for everything was Barnetts. Barnetts contacted me, and then they said "We really want to run your bike in our magazine and web site.....", then they went on to tell me they wanted me to pay the photographer, pay a model, put the RAW images on a disc, write up the article, and send it in to them at my expense. We told them to go fuck themselves, we didn't need something in print that bad.

I tell guys that if they want to get their bike in a magazine, to shoot some well-lit high rez photos, skip the model (most "models" aren't what the magazine wants with the bike, anyways), and put them on a disc, and send it to the magazine USPS signature delivery, not in an Email to them. Take a nice tight full right, tight full left, a frontal 3/4, and a rear 3/4, and a few detail shots. throw in a couple riding shots. Some of the magazines insist on at least one riding shot for the article, and a lot do riding shots for the cover. If it doesn't run, some don't want the bike. A magazine from that can usually tell if they'll be interested in it from those shots to contact you. A full shoot with a model is a waste of time and money most of the time on the submitter's part.

I'll tell you another thing, Editors aren't usually dim people when it comes to features. If you do indeed have a feature-worthy bike, and If you're going to pay to have your bike professionally shot, pay the model, and write the story, and not ask for compensation, they'll gladly run your bike for you. If a magazine truly wants your bike, they'll pick up the expense of shooting it, unless you "force" them to do it at your own expense.

Oh, and if you do send in a full feature to a bunch of magazines, and by chance a magazine (or several) does pick it up, pick a magazine, and tell the other magazines you're spoken for. Don't be a hog and have your bike in 3 magazines in the same month - that's a no class act on your part, prevents somebody else who might have gotten a feature that month instead of you the chance to have one, and there's nothing an editor hates more is to see the bike they picked for their cover in a competing magazine in the same print month. And, chances are, you won't be considered by either editor ever again for a feature in his/her magazine. Editors have long memories.

And, I've never had the value of a bike increased by having a feature on it in a magazine. That's just an additional selling point/inducement for a potential buyer. It always cracks me up to see a person's bike immediately up for sale on Ebay and the online classifieds the week the magazine it was in hits the stands.

K6
01-02-2013, 1:14 AM
Nice legs on that teacher!

DetroitSpeedMetal
01-02-2013, 9:32 PM
I guess I will chime in here too. I was an Associate Editor for a large magazine that featured a lot of "Backstreet Choppers" and the guys that run that magazine are not cock-suckers. They are businessmen. If you want to get your bike in a magazine here is the best way:

1-Contact someone that writes for the magazine regularly. The web is a great place to make contact. Try to select someone that writes the type of articles that are most like your bike. Chances are if your bike meets his or her likes that will aid your cause. Just remember...they get thousands (literally thousands) of requests. Don't take it personal if they decline.

2-Be polite to them...if they decline...be even more polite. Remember "your bike" is "your bike" and honestly you are the only one that "has" to like it. If you want to be considered a "builder" you need to build more than one bike and everyone has to earn their bones...this doesn't happen overnight. It takes years sometimes.

3-On models...I hate to say it but most guys think all they need is some oiled up stripper to lay on their bike. That is the farthest from the truth. In the magazine that I wrote for we only hired professional models from an agency. I know that your old lady is hot...but remember...the only one that needs to think she is hot is YOU!

4-Try to attend some bike shows. That is a great place to meet writers and editors. Most of the magazines will accept contributions if they are done right.

5-Photography is key. You cant use a small DPI (dots per inch) camera even though you have a large megapixel camera. The large megapixels are good for printing posters or 8x10's but not for rich print magazine quality photos. Shoot your pics in JPEG RAW format and then edit them. I am not a great photographer but I have done it both with me doing the shoot as well as hiring a pro. Never underestimate hiring a pro.

Note: If you are going to hire a pro, try to hire one that has a relationship with a magazine already. A magazine may be more inclined to run the bike because they know that certain photographers know their requirements.

6-Try to write your own feature article. This needs to be 1,000 words. Not 900, not 800, not 1099. Writing a feature is not always easy. An article that is 1,000 to 1,010 will fit on the pages that the magazine already has ear-marked for a feature.

Last but not least...be patient. Unless a staffer pushes your shit to the front it can take over a year to get the feature ran. There were times I had three or four articles in the can waiting. If someone asks you to pay to put your bike in...politely decline.

If you can provide a complete package you never know...you may even be offered a contributor spot and you may even get paid to feature other builder's bikes.

byronj
01-03-2013, 12:35 PM
My Buddy started Junk Mag and I was working with him on it and we did most of the legwork. Nobody had to pay for anything unless they wanted to. We had a few models that asked for pay and we couldnt pay ourselves so they didnt get paid either. What we would do is ensure that each submission at least got some free copies of the mag to pass out to thier buddies and show off. Thats all we could offer. Most people where cool with it and just appreciated the exposure.

selectedgrub
01-03-2013, 2:57 PM
Thanks for all the replies and insight.
I don't think my ride would cut the mustard. It's not mainstream.
Regardless I just wanted to get an idea what was involved.
Stll wouldn't mind knowing who owns the photos and copyright issues.