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View Full Version : Who powdercoats at home??



Spm1101
12-30-2012, 8:48 PM
whats up guys, just picked up a harbor freight powdercoat set up. shot some stuff today will most likely upgrade to the eastwood set up because i have a lot of stuff to shoot for a bagger project. im going to be down at my local shop blasting a bunch of stuff tmrw and wanted to do my rims. was wondering if anyone has pics of their home powdercoat set up and what the best way to fit these 16" rims in my oven haha

mreed
12-30-2012, 8:52 PM
Before I built a bigger oven I laid mine on its back, wrapped a 3/4" piece of plywood with aluminum foil, hung the wheel with "plumber strap" and laid the board on top. Never had bad results, it was just a pain in the ass to be doing all of the time.

http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l194/reactivecustoms/Sportster%20Sport/0715120330.jpg

http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l194/reactivecustoms/Sportster%20Sport/0715120506.jpg

vnygra
12-30-2012, 9:40 PM
No pics but I've been doing it in the garage for a few years and can tell you the Eastwood gun isn't any better than the hf one. Not sure about the new variable one they have though.

Spm1101
12-30-2012, 9:43 PM
so you just rested it on foil? did you do one side at a time? maybe thats an idea just to be on the safe side

SacredSteel63
12-30-2012, 9:48 PM
I may be out of line here and I'm sure some hardcore Eastwood nut will put me in my place but the Eastwood Co. just puts their name on things and doesn't really have their own line of anything. Just jack up the price with their name on it. I don't buy from anymore for that reason.

Spm1101
12-30-2012, 9:52 PM
Before I built a bigger oven I laid mine on its back, wrapped a 3/4" piece of plywood with aluminum foil, hung the wheel with "plumber strap" and laid the board on top. Never had bad results, it was just a pain in the ass to be doing all of the time.

http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l194/reactivecustoms/Sportster%20Sport/0715120330.jpg

http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l194/reactivecustoms/Sportster%20Sport/0715120506.jpg



haha im so confused for whatever reason as to what you mean!

ugotbit
12-30-2012, 9:57 PM
I'm ready to start coating at home also, I just scored a free oven.

I was going to go with the Eastwood dual voltage set up, based on the reviews of the gun being better quality than the original set up.

Anyone got any other reccomondations?

I believe what mreed is saying is he built a "box" and lined it with foil, then placed over the open oven giving him more baking area so he could fit his wheel inside.

Spm1101
12-30-2012, 10:05 PM
i guess that could work. sealing it up would be a pain in the balls, better off removing the elements and using steel studs insulation and making one

mreed
12-31-2012, 12:04 AM
Yeah. Took about 15 min to make the box and it took about 5 min to set it up every time. I didn't sit them in there. I hung them by a piece of all-thread.

I have a few different guns and this one by far is my favorite. the big guns are too much of a hassle to dig out and this one generates its own dry air.

http://www.amazon.com/Craftsman-Complete-Portable-Powder-Coating/dp/B004YEAYCW

Cory
12-31-2012, 12:48 AM
I got the Harbor Freight gun and it works every bit as good as my buddy's Eastwood gun. One tip that has made my stuff turn out way better is to preheat the parts. Get that shit hot and then apply the powder. It just seems to flow out way nicer when the parts are hot.

mreed
12-31-2012, 12:57 AM
There are part temps per powder manufacturer. They need to be at a certain temp. for best results.

Jetblack
12-31-2012, 8:46 AM
Those UV heaters are supposed to work great sans an oven...some powders have different melting points. I'd love to get my hands on one of the shipyard powder coaters; it's a blow torch type of setup that ovens the powder as you spray it on.

Here's some newer ovenless and torchless units to drool over: http://resodyncoatings.com/products-portable-powder-coating/

Spm1101
12-31-2012, 2:08 PM
can i get away with cleaning the rim really good and going over the existing harley powdercoat on harley touring mags?

Saltytonk
01-01-2013, 10:31 AM
I've got the Eastwwod dual voltage unit. And I've had experience with the single voltage unit.
Both work well . I realize they dont actually make them but I dont see that thier prices are jacked up.
The Craftsman unit looks intresting..
I've got a small 20" oven I use . Plan on building a bigger one.
Prep is the key to good results ( as with any kind of painting) . Make sure its clean and grease and oil free. Tape off areas that dont need coating. Preheat is a must.

The procedure is really simple. And I love the reults.
The only problems I've experienced was doing multi coats with a single voltage gun .
The top coat will have a funky texture. Kind of an orange peel type of thing.
The dual voltage gun does much better at the multi coats.

Spm1101
01-08-2013, 3:37 PM
i think i have the same rims im trying to do now, they have the powdercoat on there already. can i powdercoat over it?

1moonshiner
01-13-2013, 12:11 PM
its hard to powdercoat over existing material. You could just clean a bare spot off to ground your gun to, and see if the powder will stick. Chances are it won't stick evenly all over. You may try to heat it up also. If it were me, I'd just blast it first. Good luck

DannySLC
01-13-2013, 4:05 PM
I just got started powder coating small parts and its crazy how easy it is. I got on eBay and bought a craftsman powder coating system for $35 then went and bought a large toaster oven for $40. Ordered a couple colors from Eastwood and I'm set. I know that the craftsman gun isn't the best but I've just been making sure to keep it clean and not throw it around like a jerk. I've done a couple air cleaners, mids, nuts & bolts, brackets, engine mounts, and even the handles of my ratchets so I know when dudes steal my tools. Couldn't be happier.

malloy
01-13-2013, 7:51 PM
been powdercoating at home for a few years. whatever you do, don't use the HF powder. it's sucks ass. I've had real good results with powder buy the pound. I got a kitchen oven in my garage. ( craigslist score for 75.00) I also use a HF gun, but I did the mod to add a remote hopper. once you mod the HF gun, it works really great. also good clean air is a must. I use a moisture seperate off of the compressor, then 2 disposible filters on the gun it self. ( double-stacked) also get a good digital therometer for the oven.

Deadly0001
01-17-2013, 8:20 AM
I powder coat my nuts with talcom powder, does that count?

guiltyview
01-17-2013, 8:37 AM
I have a few different guns and this one by far is my favorite. the big guns are too much of a hassle to dig out and this one generates its own dry air.

http://www.amazon.com/Craftsman-Complete-Portable-Powder-Coating/dp/B004YEAYCW

this seems pretty cool, i may grab it. i have just the original gun from eastwood and then at work we have the Hot Coat Pro 1100, but I might just get this one for when I'm trying to do something quick

helltaco
01-17-2013, 12:08 PM
I wouldn't discourage anyone from DIY, but my experience is that powder, like paint, is best left to the pros if you care about quality and reliability. A pro level gun and quality oven will give much different results than a HF gun and an old stove. It's like using a spraycan to paint something, it's hard to control and the results are uneven if you use cheap equipment, and to make up for it you have to lay it on a lot thicker which looks bad and doesn't stick as well. Also like paint, prep is extremely important. I've gone to two different PC shops that used a homemade oven and it peeled off in a month both times. I like to ride my bike, not keep it under a cover, so from now on I found the best, most professional shop and will use them for all my coating. When you walk in everything is clean and organized. The oven was made specifically for powdercoating, and the temperature is even all the way through (unlike that old stove with just a heating element at the bottom). At the low quality shops, there was mess and crap everywhere. One shop the guy was smoking while he worked. For me, it's one of those things that you gotta pay extra to do it right the first time or you'll be paying to do it over.

guiltyview
01-17-2013, 4:23 PM
I wouldn't discourage anyone from DIY, but my experience is that powder, like paint, is best left to the pros if you care about quality and reliability. A pro level gun and quality oven will give much different results than a HF gun and an old stove. It's like using a spraycan to paint something, it's hard to control and the results are uneven if you use cheap equipment, and to make up for it you have to lay it on a lot thicker which looks bad and doesn't stick as well. Also like paint, prep is extremely important. I've gone to two different PC shops that used a homemade oven and it peeled off in a month both times. I like to ride my bike, not keep it under a cover, so from now on I found the best, most professional shop and will use them for all my coating. When you walk in everything is clean and organized. The oven was made specifically for powdercoating, and the temperature is even all the way through (unlike that old stove with just a heating element at the bottom). At the low quality shops, there was mess and crap everywhere. One shop the guy was smoking while he worked. For me, it's one of those things that you gotta pay extra to do it right the first time or you'll be paying to do it over.

honestly it's really not that hard. just gather a bunch of shit you don't care about and practice